1001 Albums: Groovin’

#95

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Artist: The Young Rascals

Album: Groovin’

Year: 1967

Length: 34: 34

Genre: Rhythm and Blues / Blue-eyed Soul

“Whatcha tryin’ to do to my heart
Whatcha tryin’ to do to my heart
You go around, tellin’ lies, and now you wanna compromise
Whatcha tryin’ to do to my heart
You better run, you better hide, you better leave from my side, yeah”

Are the 60s over yet? Am I almost done? I don’t know how much more I can take especially when I encounter albums that are so very 60s sounding. How many more albums that delve into psychedlia can I take? Do we really need to hear every single band that decided to try their hand at Psychedelic music? Is it really necessery? WELL IS IT???

The Young Rascals are less Psychedelic and more radio friendly pop (or as the book would tell me one of the few white bands that can really deliver a soulful performance that stands against their African american counterparts… sure I guess). All I remember from The Young Rascals was their big hit Groovin’ playing on one of my dad’s old 60s compilation albums. Didn’t like it that much then and… I guess it’s grown on me a bit but is still skippable in my opinion. I find this album is emblematic of the sound of 60s pop music. All you need is to check this one out to get a good idea of the sort of music that was at the top of the charts. It’s easily digestible, a little cheesy and good, clean fun. Any goof who only listens to radio music sure would love this kind of stuff but if you’re looking for something with a little more depth to it than this is probably not for you.

I’m not saying it’s bad, not at all. It’s a decent album, the band clearly is skilled and the singer knows how to sing damn well but… come on… it’s pure 60s nostalgia music here at this point. I found myself at odds because there would be moments where I felt damn this band is doing something cool here and then moments where I’d groan because it was just another single. No joke, eight of these 11 songs were fucking singles. That’s what you get when you listen to an album by a band notorious for singles and patchy albums, an album where they at least try to give you something cool but still feels like a collection of singles. By the time I hit the final song that tried hard to at some psychedelic vibes to it with interesting experimentation, I just felt it wasn’t deserved at that point.

I’m actually at a loss of understanding as to why this was included on the 1001 albums list. I mean it seems to hold the great distinction that it holds a number 1 hit and the band tried something new… Ok? I feel the biggest distinction that this album can say for itself is that it’s included on this list because I honestly don’t see anything special about it. I mean, the tunes are good and I can see where the book says that they’re incredibly soulful white guys and do a good job at it but the entire run time I just felt like I was listening to some typical 60s music. Is that why it’s there because it’s a great time capsule to the 60s pop charts? Is that it??? What is it???

I mean… I liked some tunes. I remember enjoying a few very much… but… Jesus this album just feels a little forgettable. Not as forgettable as Fred Neil mind you, it at least has something to it, but I just don’t really see myself listening to it again. Maybe I just need to give it a second chance, maybe I went into it expecting it to be this way, maybe I had formed my opinion before I even listened to it because honestly it’s a pretty decent album…

I’m overthinking this. Maybe I’ll revisit it one day but for now it’s left a meh taste in my mouth (or ears) and I guess I can say it was pretty ok. That’s that. Like they had a song called Find Somebody which just felt like a slightly mediocre version of Jefferson Airplane’s Somebody To Love. Seriously the lyrics at some points are almost exactly the same.

Man, I’d love to listen to Somebody To Love again, just recently sang it at Karaoke. My friends wanted me to sing it like Jim Carrey did in The Cable Guy but I decided to just do it in my own way.

Why am I talking about Jefferson Airplane? What album is next? oh…. (nice sequeway…. :|…)

Song of Choice: You Better Run

-Bosco

 

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1001 Albums: Younger Than Yesterday

#94

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Artist: The Byrds

Album: Younger Than Yesterday

Year: 1967

Length: 29:11

Genre: Psychedelic Rock

“Ah, but I was so much older then
I’m younger than that now
Half-wracked prejudice leaped forth
Rip down all hate, I screamed
Lies that life is black and white
Spoke from my skull I dreamed
Romantic facts of musketeers
Foundationed deep, somehow
Ah, but I was so much older then
I’m younger than that now”

The Byrds are back and at it again. I honestly didn’t expect to see The Byrds appear so often on this list, but that’s mainly because I only knew two Byrds’ songs so I was kind of surprised to see how much influence and impact they made, especially in the 60s. Younger Than Yesterday doesn’t feel like anything spectacular or really new when it comes to the band. It’s exactly what you’d probably expect from The Byrds, I know it was for me. The minute the opening notes of the opening song started I knew I was in for a very straightforward Byrds album. Nothing more and nothing else.

That being said I thoroughly enjoyed it and thought this album was a blast. It was a ton of fun from beginning to end. It threw in some nice surprises once in awhile showing off the groups experimentation with psychedelic rock. A mix of reverse tapes, odd instruments and some mind-melting sections of their songs added some decent touches to the album that at least made it feel like a step forward from their previous efforts so it wasn’t 100% just more of the same. It honestly doesn’t disappoint as a Byrds album and it’s uniform enough to keep you engaged the whole way through, with some tunes slowing down to allow you to take a breath and others just being a ton of fun.

This album reminded me a lot of The Beatles’ Revolver in a lot of ways and for some reason I felt a sort of parrallel. If I was to make an analogy I would call this the Byrds’ Revolver, a maturing band trying new things but still keeping what made them them. But where I felt Revolver was a bit of a mess and felt more like a compilation than an album this one stands out as being incredibly cohesive and despite the different styles they do try out (folk and country being an example) it somehow still flows really well from one song to another and no song ever appears in a jarring way. There’s such a natural progression to the whole album that you don’t even feel the time pass. I remember checking to see which song I was at only to find I had two songs left. That’s always a good sign in my books. I honestly do feel like The Byrds were the American equivalent of The Beatles and although The Beatles had emerged as bigger and more mature by this point, especially musically, it does sound like The Byrds are working their way up to that point. That could just all be speculation since I’ve never heard any of their later albums, but they do have a few more yet to come on the list, so it’s very possible they could meet that expectation (although I read they sort of delve into country rock later on and seeing as I’m just not a fan of country music it’s possible I might either hate it or love the Byrds take on it… who knows).

If you like The Byrds this is definitely one to check out. I feel it stands the test of time better than their previous albums. Their first albums feel sort of stuck in their time but this one comes across a little more timeless, even with the very obvious 60s vibe. Put it on today and it still feels a little fresh. But just a little. I guess I could say this is currently my favourite Byrds album but I’m not about to start ranking the albums of every band that has multiple albums on this list. So, I’ll just leave it at that, a fun and enjoyable Byrds album that I’ll probably take a listen to again at some point in my life… possibly.

Song of Choice: So You Want to be a Rock n’ Roll Star

-Bosco

1001 Albums: The Doors

#93

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Artist: The Doors

Album: The Doors

Year: 1967

Length: 44:48

Genre: Psychedelic/Acid Rock

“This is the end, beautiful friend
This is the end, my only friend, the end
Of our elaborate plans, the end
Of everything that stands, the end
No safety or surprise, the end
I’ll never look into your eyes, again”

I am both happy and sad a this moment. Happy because I absolutely love this album and I would easily rank it as one of the best albums of the sixties. Sad because for the first time in my blog I have not been able to meet something I wanted to do. You see, I wanted to play this fun game called Albums I Actually Own. It wasn’t really a game to be honest but the idea was everytime I encountered an album I own on Vinyl I was going to post a picture of myself holding it up. Yes it’s a little self-indulgent, but my vinyl collection is one of my most prized possessions and I’m really proud of it. We all have hobbies and things we love dearly, vinyl collecting just happens to be one of those things for me. Unfortunately since I moved to Toronto I had to stop with the vinyl purchases due to monetary issues (suddenly paying rent and bills and having a job that can only pay for that really makes it tough to spend on luxuries) so my collecting has halted until I start making enough to go back to it. Also unfortunately my entire collection is still back in Montreal meaning when it came to playing Albums I Actually Own I couldn’t get a snapshot of me holding it. Oh well…

But that being said, I won’t give up.

So the first album to appear on my very special edition of Albums I Own is in fact The Doors!

[insert photo one day]

Ok enough of that, let’s hit the album. Metaphorically of course, not… physically… that would be bad.

The Doors was another one of those bands for a long time I was kind of avoiding out of fear I’d be disappointed since I met so many people who considered them in high regard. I eventually caved in and discovered their debut and immediately fell in love with it. I’ll be honest I never really checked out their later albums and it’s really just this one I’m familiar with but that doesn’t change the fact that it’s one hell of a fantastic album. I honestly could listen to this one on repeat and never get fed up of it. Everything about it just works so damn well and is easily one of the best debut albums out there. Top 10… if not at least Top 20… if not at least Top 50… definitely Top 100… or 200…

It really is a milestone in rock music and a step forward for the psychedelic genre. The Doors blasted onto the scene with their own style, their own music and tried things that hadn’t been seen before. With a mix of flamenco influenced guitar, jazz trained drumming and some of the best organ playing ever heard, it made for a unique blend that only heightened the song writing of the group. Throw in Jim Morrison’s incredibly theatrical style of performing and you get a band unlike any other at the time. There’s no denying that The Doors really stood out as being their own band and redefining what we knew about music at the time. It was unlike anything at the time and even today holds up incredibly well and still stands out as it’s own unique piece of rock music.

I want to talk about my favourite part of the group and that’s easily their strongest and best player: Mr. Ray Manzarek. Maybe it’s because I have a soft spot for keyboards and keyboardists and have high respect for them since for the most part they’re often overlooked as people scramble to talk about guitarists and drummers (sorry bassists) but Ray Manzarek is easily the superstar of this album. Without his incredible organ playing this album just would not be the same. From the opening chords of Soul Kitchen that just bring you in and to the crazy note playing and solo of Light My Fire, which is just a mind-bending crazy experience, there’s no way these songs would work if it wasn’t for Ray’s keyboard licks and riffs. And the crazy part? While he was doing this kick-ass organ playing, his left hand was also playing the bass notes of each song. Now that’s some serious skill that not every group has (The only other one I can think of off the top of my head was The B-52’s, but I’m sure there’s more). He’s definitely in my top 5 keyboardists of all time.

I don’t really know what else I could say about this album because it’s really an experience that you as a listener need to experience for yourself. Maybe it won’t do anything for you, but it definitely does a lot for me and this is one I love to always listen to again when I’m in the right mood. It never fails to make me happy, even the long depressing final song of The End manages to make me smile, not because of its themes but just how great the music is. And The End really ends (haha) the album in a great way. It’s consistent in sound and flows beautifully where it’s almost 45 minute run time doesn’t feel that long at all. You immerse yourself in the album and just have a great time the whole way through (and clearly the band is having a great time as well).

This is definitely one for the history books in terms of rock music and one that will continue to stand the test of time for years and decades and centuries to come.

Never forget.

Song of Choice: Light My Fire

-Bosco

 

 

1001 Albums: Francis Albert Sinatra and Antonio Carlos Jobim

#92

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Artist: Frank Sinatra

Album: Francis Albert Sinatra and Antonio Carlos Jobim

Year: 1967

Length: 28:05

Genre: Bossa Nova / Traditional Pop

“Quiet nights of quiet stars quiet chords from my guitar
Floating on the silence that surrounds us
Quiet thoughts and quiet dreams quiet walks by quiet streams
And a window looking on the mountains and the sea, how lovely”

pffff… Well, I guess I need to speak about this album to some extent. It’s music alright and it’s pretty decent music. Hearing Frank Sinatra team up with Jobim to create a nice blend of Bossa Nova and traditional pop that Sinatra was famous for. Hearing Sinatra sing such classics as The Girl From Ipanema (which appeared on a previous Bossa Nova album on this list originally sung by Astrud Gilberto) was definitely quite a treat, but overall I didn’t feel it really captured my attention in any way as a whole.

All I can really say is that it’s very nice music. It felt like a good throwback to when I started the list, like listening to the albums from the 50s again. It was a nice feeling, gave me memories of the winter night when I listened to Sinatra’s In The Wee Small Hours, waiting for my bus late at night. Times were very different then. I was working in Montreal at a film company, was still living with my parents, got to see Sandra on a regular basis (and our relationship was still relatively fresh at that time), I felt more confident and comfortable with my life having less responsibilities and getting the chance to relax in a very comfortable environment. Boy have things really changed since then. Am now living in Toronto and back in school, living on my own with basically all the responsibilities of a full-grown adult, still with Sandra and hitting close to a year and a half in our relationship, met new friends and lost old ones and am in a place where I just don’t feel as comfortable and relaxed (but that’s definitely the new responsibilities that have suddenly been thrust onto me). I’ve grown a lot since then and my Montreal days all feel like distant memories even though they weren’t that long ago. It’s funny how big changes in your life can do that.

As a whole the album was really just that, a nice album. I had it playing in the background as me and Sandra made some supper when she came up to visit and it really is the perfect music to just relax to. I always associate winter weather with this style of music, but that could really be because it was winter when I was making my way through the 50s and early 60s and it really felt like more peaceful times at the time. It was a nice break from all the 60s rock music I was going through and it felt good to get that throwback.

But with that finished it’s back to 60s rock music.

Song of Choice: The Girl From Ipanema

-Bosco

p.s What a terrible mouthful of a title for this album. Great creativity just naming it your very formal sounding versions of your names.

 

 

1001 Albums: The Velvet Underground & Nico

#91

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Artist: The Velvet Underground

Album: The Velvet Underground & Nico

Year: 1967

Length: 48:51

Genre: Art Rock

“Teenage Mary said to Uncle Dave
I sold my soul, must be saved
Gonna take a walk down to Union Square
You never know who you’re gonna find there
You gotta run, run, run, run, run”

Let’s add this album to the long list of famous albums that I just don’t really get. I was never a fan of the Velvet Underground and in the past I have tried to listen to this album with big failure. Part of me dreaded having to listen to it but part of me was intrigued because I never really did. It was a bag of mixed emotions going into it and that bag remained the same once it was done. I still have very mixed emotions about this album and honestly don’t know what to think of it.

It’s not my thing, that’s for sure. It’s not that I don’t like Art Rock or anything with experimentation, although I’m not a fan with some notable exceptions. There’s no denying these guys have talent and love to experiment in interesting ways. And I definitely will not deny the influence they’ve had on bands and how much skill went into creating this album. But it’s really an acquired taste, a difficult to swallow album that really isn’t for everyone. I get why some people love this album but I also get why people could be turned off by it. I’m unfortunately in the latter of this group, recognizing the achievement of the album but just not being into it.

One of my friend’s dared me to do a track by track review. which I thought was a terrible idea since I don’t like this album, but hey he dared me and that’s a challenge so why not. Let’s see a track by track review from the perspective of someone who isn’t a fan.

Sunday Morning:

Already a poor start for me. This feels beyond cheesy to me and if this is setting the mood for the rest of the album then we’re off to a bad start. Thankfully it’s apart stylistically and the rest of the album never returns to this cheese-fest. Please never let me endure this song again.

I’m Waiting For The Man:

Now this is what I’m talking about. Almost a proto-punk feel to it, hard guitars and a big beat. I was loving this song… until it just never ended. What the hell was going on… just the same repetitive thing over and over and over for almost 5 minutes. As much as I liked it, it just became dull after 2 minutes as I realised it just wasn’t gonna change at all.

Femme Fatale:

For those who have read my Nico review already know how I feel about this song. This would have been way better if I didn’t have to listen to Nico’s stupid voice. I hate her singing, sounds like she has a muffin stuffed in the back of her throat. I can see why the band and Andy Warhol like her being a bunch of underground pretentious arteeests, but honestly I just can’t stand it. Good song, better off with a different singer.

Venus in Furs:

Ugh. I guess this song is good, if you like high-pitched wailing sounds similar to bagpipes blaring in your ear. Big points for the whole art rock, experimental aspect, lose points because I found this obnoxious to my ears. Couldn’t wait for it to end and of course it was over 5 minutes long. Lucky me.

Run Run Run:

Solid tune. Really liked this one, probably my favourite. Nothing more to say, just really enjoyed it.

All Tomorrow’s Parties:

Snooze… another Nico song and of course this one is 6 minutes long. I was honestly just bored with this one and couldn’t grasp it at all. Maybe I just wanted to be over with this album by now but this song just didn’t do it for me. It’s one of my friend’s favourites… good for him I guess, maybe he’ll explain it to me one day.

Heroin:

Here is a great example when experimental music works very well. Dark subject matter mixed in with the instrumentation as a recreation of an experience. I thoroughly enjoyed this one and really liked what they set out to do. Thumbs up from me.

There She Goes Again:

Enjoyable. Sounds like they’re doing their best at a Bob Dylan impression, as tons of bands were doing at the time. Mostly just in the intonations of the vocals. Good stuff.

I’ll Be Your Mirror:

I honestly don’t remember this one and it seems to be the shortest of the album, so maybe that’s why. Need a quick re-listen to jog my memory. Give me a second…

Just as I suspected… another Nico song. I must have blocked it out of my memory and thanked god it was so short. Oh well, next.

The Black Angel’s Death Song:

My friend wanted me to write a whole paragraph on this one. I really didn’t want to seeing as I am obviously not the right person to write a retrospective on this album or delve deep and go into analysis since I’m not a an at all. But a challenge is a challenge so I figure I can fill up space with nonsense just so I can fill up a paragraph’s worth of words. Another bag-pipe sounding song, but not nearly as annoying as the other one, here it’s way more enjoyable and pleasant. I wish I could break this one down more than currently am (which is barely anything to begin with so whatever) but who knows, I’ll let the fans break this one down and I’ll just move my way through, enjoying the experience and broadening my horizons in music knowledge. Is this enough words for a paragraph? I guess so, he better be happy.

European Son:

Longest song on the album but wholly deserving of it’s length. I was really quick to save this one to my playlist before it took a sudden turn into weird territory. The beginning is a little misleading for what’s to come in the rest of the song. Loved it then got caught off guard and then got lost in the wild experimentation that was this song. It was a brain-melting experience but I’ll give it to them it was one that was worth sitting through this entire album. Great ending to an otherwise meh experience.

 

So there you have it, my brief and underwhelming track by track review of this album. Funnily enough, when this album first came out it bombed completely being deemed a financial and critical failure, selling barely any copies and just not getting the reviews it probably, maybe deserved. It’s only until years later when musicians of those times started talking about this album and the part it played in influencing them that it started to get the recognition it deserved. So who knows, maybe history will repeat itself and years from now I’ll finally rediscover it as the masterpiece it is. Or maybe I’ll stay stuck in the 60s mindset and be like… meh.

We will see.

Song of Choice: Run Run Run

-Bosco

1001 Albums: The Who Sell Out

#90

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Artist: The Who

Album: The Who Sell Out

Year: 1967

Length: 38:46

Genre: Psychedelic Pop / Power Pop

“If you think that I don’t know about the little tricks you’ve played
And never see you when deliberately you put things in my way”

 

Those cheeky bastards are at it again.

After a long, long, long hiatus (probably the longest one I’ve ever had) I have returned and boy have I returned with a doozy of an album. I have to admit so far I do think this is one of the best albums I’ve heard so far, and if not my favourite, it definitely has a spot in the top 5 thus far. I always liked The Who and remember listening to this album over a year ago. But back then I was kind of just listening without listening, going through the discography and the motions and ending each one with a “yeah I liked that”. Thankfully this one appeared on this list because it allowed me to rediscover it and I have to say it has firmly placed itself as my current favourite Who album.

I wouldn’t be surprised if a lot of people feel this way. It’s easy to put one of their later albums as a favourite to due to the maturity of their songwriting and even their first due to it’s raw rock power, but this one just resonates on so many levels. It’s important to note that this is The Who’s first concept album and arguably their greatest one, or at least their most successful as a concept. Unlike their later album Tommy, which depended on a narrative flow and story to hold it altogether, this one was able to have each of their songs stand on their own as mastered works but together bring out a much clearer picture.

For those who don’t know The Who have managed to successfully create a concept for an album that is masterfully executed in it’s pure simplicity. With the rise of Pirate Radios and rock music, they decided to create an entire album that gave the experience of listening to one of these channels. In between all their songs they have included radio adverts and jingles that never distract from the album but rather add a lot to it. It doesn’t end there, as if these guys weren’t cheeky enough, their songs satirize consumerism as a whole. It does this so masterfully by both glorifying the consumer culture while at the same time poking fun of it. It’s subtle but there’s never a moment that these boys don’t have their tongues firmly placed in their cheeks.

Outside of the concept, the songs on this album are just purely fantastic. I could listen to a vast majority of them on repeat and still be just as engaged by it as my first listening. Including their hit I Can See For Miles, other great ones include Odorono, Tattoo, I can’t Reach You as some that stood out for me. Even a humourous song like Silas Stingy which sticks out a little manages to still feel just as great (although the humour is cranked up in this one). It’s only by the end of the album that I sort of get out of it with Sunrise and Rael 1 and 2 just not really doing it for me, but that’s personal preference as they hold up well with the rest of the album. They managed to take on psychedelic sensibilities and turn it into a pop sound. It’s very much a psychedelic album disguised as pop rock (or is it the other way around?) and this is really what gives it it’s personality. Mixed with fantastic production and great harmonizing vocals and you have a classic.

One could easily break this album down and if we did we would be here for a very long time, which isn’t my intent, I’m mostly just here for the experience. But what an experience it was. The Who Sell Out has easily placed itself very high on my list of favourite albums. Who knows, maybe one day I’ll attempt a song by song analysis of this album, but until then I’ll just enjoy it for what it is: One of the greatest concept albums of all time.

Song of Choice: I Can See For Miles

-Bosco

1001 Albums: Piper at the Gates of Dawn

#89

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Artist: Pink Floyd

Album: Piper at the Gates of Dawn

Year: 1967

Length: 41:51

Genre: Psychedelic Rock / Experimental Rock

Why’d’ya have to leave me there
Hanging in my infant air
Waiting?
You only have to read the lines
They’re scribbly black and everything shines

And it happened. I was wondering when I’d get to Pink Floyd. I knew they would come around eventually, I mean obviously they would be on the list… how could they not? They’re one of those bands, you know? The kind that evveryyoooone talks about as being soooooo amazingly amazing that they’re amazingness cannot be topped by how amazingly amazing they are? Also, I knew because I’ve already looked at the list and know they have at least three more albums on it… so… yeah….

I’ll be honest, I wasn’t looking forward to listening to this album… or any Pink Floyd album really. If you didn’t catch on my sarcasm in the last paragraph… I’m not a fan at all. I had the pleasure/displeasure (depending how you look at it) of listening to their entire discography a little over a year ago. Boy was I met with such a mixed bag of feelings and had no idea how I felt about them at all. To this day I still don’t know how to feel about them. All I know is that, I’m not crazy about them and you won’t find me seeking out to listen to their work or buy their albums, however… I can see why people would love them.

And I mean normal music-loving people and not pretentious stoner dudes who think getting high and listening to Dark Side of the Moon somehow elevates them to a transcendent state of mind that is awe-inspiring and mind-blowing, because seriously if you need drugs to enjoy something… that’s not a good sign. I hate those people. But… I do have good friends who re level-headed and grounded who love Pink Floyd and I can see their point-of-view.

This really is something different and unique. To call this psychedelic music is a little bit of an understatement. This takes the idea of psychedelia and turns it up to 11. If you told me Syd Barrett was high on LSD (which he was) then I would not be surprised. I’m actually more surprised that the rest of the band were pretty much sober. Only the whacked out mind of a man whose mind was slowly deteriorating would be able to come up with something like this. Which, sad story, actually happened to Syd Barrett. There’s a really heart breaking story where Pink Floyd were recording an album and some fat kinda sad dude walked in and it took them a long time before they realised it was their old friend Syd. They mentioned it as one of the saddest moments they ever experienced in their life. Even around this time, Syd would sometimes be so far gone, they’d have to drag him on stage and he’d just stand there with his arms hanging down. The crowd went nuts anyway because they just loved Syd, for better or worse. Syd seemed to have that kind of power over people and I think this debut album perfectly encapsulates everything that Syd Barret was, from the mind-warping to the insanely genius.

Every song is a little bit of him. You could get a straight-forward psych song such as Lucifer Sam and then have to sit through 9 minutes of almost hard-bop style jazz (Interstellar Overdrive). There’s even songs that trick you, starting off as a straight-forward song only to switch over and take you on a mind-bending trip (Take Up Thy Stethoscope and Walk). Anyone whose really into this style would easily put this at the top of their lists, and as much as I recognize all this… it still wasn’t for me.

No matter what anyone tells me and no matter how much I see it, I’ll never be into Pink Floyd. I just don’t get it, I guess. First time I heard this album a little over a year ago, it actually gave me a massive headache. I don’t know if that’s a good thing or a bad thing in retrospect, but headaches are never a good thing for me. I wish I could love them. I wish I could see what dorm room stoners see when they put a Pink Floyd album on. But I just don’t… maybe my personal tastes in music just suck, or maybe their just different, or maybe I’m counter-counter-culture and like just being against the norm… who knows?

Pink Floyd will always be one of those bands that left a mark on music history, alongside The Beatles and Led Zeppelin of every cliched top 10 list. But looking past my personal feelings… I guess I can see it and I guess that’s all that matters… I guess.

Well, I might be slowing down with the albums again for the next week or so. One of my favourite bands just released a new song and I have plans to write a separate article ranking their albums from worst to best. They have roughly 23 albums… so that might take awhile to plan out. But I’ll still try my best to get an album on the list checked off once in awhile.

Song of Choice: Take Up Thy Stethoscope and Walk

-Bosco