1001 Albums: Bookends

#125

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Artist: Simon and Garfunkel

Album: Bookends

Year: 1968

Length: 29:51

Genre: Folk Rock

“Cathy, I’m lost, I said though I knew she was sleeping
And I’m empty and aching and I don’t know why
Counting the cars on the New Jersey Turnpike
They’ve all come to look for America
All come to look for America
All come to look for America”

You beautiful bastards.

Why have I avoided Simon and Garfunkel all these years? Ok, I didn’t avoid them, it’s not like I was trying my best to make sure I never listened to them, but I never actively sought out their music to listen to. Like most people I knew their biggest hits and thought they were decent but the style was never my thing and I had no interest in digging deeper into their material. Maybe it’s good I didn’t because I just wouldn’t have had the appreciation for it then as I do now. So maybe I was meant to be exposed to them now and this was just the right time for me to truly appreciate the music they were creating and what they did. Maybe, I don’t know, I’m kind of talking out of my ass right now.

Maybe it was the right music at the right time. Last weekend I moved to a new place and everyone knows how fun and joyful moving is. With stress levels high, frustration on the brink of rage, injuries increasing in number and the hot, sweltering heat destroying us all, having some soothing music was exactly the dose of calming I think I needed. I mean, I didn’t listen to it as I was moving, but around the time, so good enough for me to make it count. I’m happy to say I am now moved in to a place I really like. No more basement apartment for me. I have big windows that look out into an amazing backyard, a cabin like aesthetic for my room (with fireplace included, functional? I am not about to try and find out) and my own little living room. Before I was living on my own but am now in a house with 7 other people. I figured it’d be an experience, one that I needed, never lived in a shared environment with others my age before, so will give me a chance to grow as a person I feel.

Bookends is a pretty simple album with a lot of depth to it. Instrumentally I can’t say anything interesting about it, it’s our duo playing away on their acoustic guitars, and for the most part evokes very black and white, yet mostly grey imagery, but that’s kind of the point. The only time I really noticed the instrumentation was at the beginning where a bass line was played by a Moog synthesizer which caught me off guard completely. Did not expect that on a Simon and Garfunkel album. It added a nice colour to the story of a drug abusing mother and her ill-fated child. Oh yeah, Simon and Garfunkel are not the cheeriest of people on this album I should add. There’s a lot of themes of adulthood, disillusionment, loneliness, mortality and growing old, which doesn’t make for the happiest of music. Even when their tunes sound upbeat, lyrically they’re coming from the minds of two cynical young adults who are having difficulty coming to terms with society around them. I guess this is why this album really resonated with the youth of America as it represented the feelings they were going through (almost A La Bob Dylan). Actually, Dylan is a great comparison because the album as a whole feels very Dylanesque, especially “Freewheelin'”. It definitely fits into the same realm of that album and though it never quite hits that high it still hits it’s mark exactly where it aimed to be.

As a concept album it works very well. The Bookends theme fits very nicely, opening and ending Side A as a cycle of life. Side A tells a story from childhood to old age, going through the motions of you’re average life cycle. We see a couple trying to find their own version of America that they feel they’ve lost, disillusioned and wandering. We are even met with a song that is basically just a compilation of old farts having conversations (tedious to sit though but fits in nicely within the themes of the album). However, the concept seems to end on Side A and doesn’t continue on for the entirety of the album, which is kind of odd. Why only make half the album a concept album? So what’s on Side B? Essentially songs they created for the movie The Graduate that didn’t make it into the soundtrack. That’s it. Not to say it isn’t good because they are great tunes, some of my favourite off the album. It’s just a weird choice to end the concept halfway through and make the other half a compilation album of sorts. Did they just give up after creating a handful of tunes and figured that was enough? Or was it planned that the concept only needed that amount of tunes and they figured they’d use the rest of the album to show off other work that hadn’t been released?

Hard to say, but really looking at it, oddly enough the Side B tunes fit rather well with the themes of the album. They wouldn’t have fit into the main concept as none really tell a story within the cycle of life, but Paul Simon’s (he was the main songwriter) cynicism is heavily oozing through every single one of these tunes and it becomes a bleak and sometimes satirical take on what’s happening around him. Fakin’ It almost feels like he’s expressing how he feels about his current relationship with Art and At The Zoo takes an almost Orwellian look at society, comparing humans to different breeds of animals. Whether you like it or not, Paul Simon was a damn good songwriter and what really sells this album above everything is the lyricism and painful emotions that seep through the vocals (Those harmonies will never not be beautiful). Apparently, Paul Simon was in a constant state of being high, which he stated exaggerated those emotions within him as he got way to introspective and that’s how he was able to get that pain across on his music. Whatever works I guess.

This was also the album that made Simon and Garfunkel the biggest rock duo of the time. It blasted them into super stardom and with the hit “Mrs. Robinson” under their belt, there was no way they could fall from this (they would keep their fame until they broke up and moved on to solo careers). Listening to it, I actually found it hard to put myself in the perspective of 1968 when it came out. Don’t get me wrong, It’s a fantastic album, but to the point of impact it made I’m finding it hard to put myself in that time-frame and truly understand how it happened. Usually I could, even with albums I don’t enjoy (cough cough Beatles) but this one doesn’t sound like it would have the impact that it apparently did. Maybe it is just how it resonated with the youth and that was enough to propel them far and beyond the point they ever imagined.

Honestly, I can try to wrap my head around it but it doesn’t really matter because at the end of the day it did have that impact and no sense of questioning or analyses can change that. I’m happy it did because it holds up today and is a solid album all around and I hope that it’s legacy continues on into the future.

Song of Choice: Fakin’ It

-Bosco

 

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1001 Albums: S.F. Sorrow

#124

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Artist: The Pretty Things

Album: S.F. Sorrow

Year: 1968

Length: 40:59

Genre: Psychedelic Pop / Rock Opera

“For ten weeks now number three stood empty
Nobody thought there would be
Family laughter behind the windows
Or a Christmas tree.
Then a couple from up north
Sorrow and his wife arrived
Before the sun had left the streets
They were living inside.
Then before too long
The street it rang with the sound
From number three there came a cry
S. F. Sorrow is born.”

I’m frustrated. Very Frustrated. I would even say extremely frustrated. Ever have one of those situations where you have a lot to say but have no idea how to say it? The words for whatever reason just aren’t coming out, you’re sentences make no sense, you try to string together thoughts and ideas into a cohesive structure but only nonsense comes out. You want to sound smart but instead you sound dumb. You try your best to understand something but no matter how many times you try, you look, you listen, you just can’t grasp what’s happening.

I’m frustrated.

I’ve listened to this album 4 times. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed every single time I’ve listened to it. Actually, every time I’ve listened to it it got better and better to my ears. Actually, I’m starting to love it so much I actually want to actively look for it and buy a copy for myself. It was definitely a pleasant surprise and I am willing to even call it a secret gem of the 60s (I’ll get into that a little later). But I had one issue. No matter how many times I listened to it I couldn’t remember the details of what I listened to. No matter how many times I heard each song, I couldn’t hold onto to any lyrics. It seems to be a problem I’ve been facing a lot these days and I’m not sure why. It’s frustrating to say the least. I love music, always have and always will and I love digging deep into what I’m listening to, understanding it and breaking down why it’s good. This is something I pursue to do and felt starting this blog would help me do that. But as each album goes by I find myself struggling more and more to say things in new ways. My vocabulary isn’t as rich as I’d hope it to be and my knowledge isn’t as vast as I wish it was. I found this album great in so many ways, but can’t seem to find the words to describe it.

Thankfully, google exists and I can do enough research on the album to talk a decent sized amount about it (Plus a reminder that I started this blog to chronicle my experience listening to the 1001 albums and wasn’t supposed to be reviews and analysis. But being who I am I couldn’t stop myself from doing that, maybe I should go back to how I started this blog). But until that happens, which will take me a lot to just separate myself from trying my hardest to break these albums down, let’s talk about S.F. Sorrow.

What makes this album so important is that it’s one of the first Rock Operas ever. The Sweet Things have even stated that this album was a huge influence on The Who’s Tommy, but The Who have gone on the record to say that is completely false and S.F. Sorrow played no role in influencing them at all. What’s the truth? Who knows, no one ever will at this point, but it’s clear to see they made their mark in history. Or did they?

If it was this important… why does no one talk about this band? I’ve never heard of it, no one I know has ever heard of it, this didn’t even appear in my famous rock n roll and psychedelic music class. So what gives? Why wasn’t this album more successful than it was? I mean, it’s fantastic from start to finish. I won’t go into details of the story of this rock opera (I’m not here to summarize), but it essentially tells the story of a boy named Sebastian F. Sorrow, born in a nameless town to normal parents, and the trials and tribulations of his life, from joyful adolescence to lonely old age. Side A has an upbeat and joyful feel as we hear Sebastian growing up and falling in love and getting married and going to war, but the album takes a sudden shift at Balloon Burning (an oddly macabre song that sounds super fun and happy but is about the protagonist’s wife dying in a Hindenburg type accident). Side B takes the listener on a completely different journey, going on an acid trip into Sebastian’s mind as he deals with depression and introspection, especially after he meets Baron Saturday who becomes the guide to this spirit quest. Where Side A takes on a Folk Rock approach with joyous undertones, the second half goes full on psychedelic, bringing you down with the protagonist. The shift is done so wonderfully and seamlessly and despite it being risky, the band managed to pull off a story that is incredibly engaging, that makes you feel what the protagonist is feeling and takes you on his journey with him. Unlike most Rock Operas though, the story wasn’t told through the lyrics of the song and instead was told through liner notes in between the songs lyrics on the vinyl and CD. In live performances they even had Arthur Brown perform the paragraphs in between songs.

This album had everything going for it, so why did it fall in the cracks? There seems to be many reasons. Firstly, it was released the same week as two monster albums, The Beatles’ White Album (which needs no introduction) and The Kinks’ The Village Green Preservation Society (which I have already talked about in a previous post). It was easily eclipsed by the incredibly large shadows these two albums created and there was no way it could overcome them unless for some miracle. Secondly, there was very little promotion done for the album causing it to go a little unnoticed until MoTown Records decided to pick it up to give it a boost, but Tommy had been out for months at that point and S.F Sorrow looked disappointing in comparison with critics giving it negative reviews for being pretentious and one critic even went as far as to say they “should be shot for what they’ve done to English rock lyrics”. A little harsh. It seems people also didn’t like the fact that the album told a story that was incredibly sad. They weren’t to thrilled about the fact that they left it feeling worse than when they started and that turned most listeners off to it.

I think in terms of storytelling it may have been a little ahead of it’s time. It may not have struck a chord when it first came out but I think in retrospect definitely can be hailed as a much more deserving piece of work than when it originally came out. Hopefully more and more people will discover this hidden gem and be as thoroughly entertained as I was listening to it every time.

Song of Choice: Balloon Burning

-Bosco

 

1001 Albums: The Notorious Byrd Brothers

#119

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Artist: The Byrds

Album: The Notorious Byrd Brothers

Year: 1968

Length: 28: 28

Genre: Psychedelic/ Folk / Country Rock

“No I’d rather go and journey
Where the diamond crescent’s glowing
And run across the valley
Beneath the sacred mountain
And wander through the forest
Where the trees have leaves of prisms
And break the light in colors
That no one know the names of”

It’s a plane! It’s Superman! It’s a Lead Zeppelin! No, It’s The BYRDS!!!! Again. It’s one of the few bands that I always sort of anticipate will show up once again in my playlist but I always sort of forget about at the same time. I’m actually quite surprised at how extensive their catalogue is having only known their early sixties hippie-dippie sounding tunes and never knew they had this sort of impact and growth and evolution within the music world. If you asked me if I ever thought The Byrds would be considered a band that left a mark on history I probably would have said no. But I didn’t know any better at the time having known absolutely nothing about The Byrds. Discovering their evolution has been quite the journey and that journey isn’t done yet with at least one more album to come on this list.

Ok, so what can I say about this album? According to reviews this is considered their greatest piece of work, their debatable masterpiece, the album that would leave the biggest legacy for them. It was The Byrds at their most experimental, utilizing all sorts of studio techniques and psychedelic cliches to their best. This was also their transitional album into their eventual Country Rock days but was used very subtly here with a nice blend of genres from psychedelic, folk, baroque pop and jazz. They were at the height of their songwriting bringing in everything they had t create a massively cohesive album with nary a bad moment. All this despite the many issues they had behind the scenes, from tension with David Crosby, who would be fired halfway through the session, and their drummer leaving as well. Gene Clark would return but it is uncertain what he actually provided for the album in terms of songwriting. All these issues and they still managed to release what’s considered their greatest album of all time (and sometimes even appears on top 100 albums lists).

If this is the case, then why was it so forgettable for me? No joke, I can’t remember anything of this album. it’s as if once it was completed my mind just swiped the memory of this album away form me completely. I remember the style that played throughout and the vibe I got form it for the most part, but it’s just a vague idea of the thing as a whole and I can’t go into specifics at all. Nothing from this album stuck with me in any way, shape or form. There were even times when I’d check the playlist and notice I had missed a song completely, not even knowing I had listened to it. I had to go back several time to relisten to songs to make sure Spotify didn’t just skip it, which is how I felt it was. Maybe the songs just blended in together a little too much (which is a credit to the album’s cohesiveness I guess), but I just can’t tell you about any songs in particular because I honestly don’t remember any of it.

Maybe this will go into the pile of albums I’ll revisit one day because if it really is considered their greatest work then there’s got to be something there I obviously missed (which seems to be the whole thing). Almost as if it sort of passed by me and I didn’t even notice it go. I find it such an interesting phenomenon how some albums can stick with us and others just don’t. Especially when it’s a highly valued album, you’d figure it would stick with you in some way or another, but this one just didn’t at all and I have no idea why.

That being said, there’s not much else I can really say about it. Took me doing extensive research to get to know anything about this album so I could at least talk about something related to it, but I’ve reached my capacity to say anything about it. Sorry to disappoint but sometimes that’s how it is and with 1001 albums on this list I’m bound to hit a ton that just don’t resonate with me in one way or another and I have nothing to say about. Can’t like everything and can’t connect with everything. That’s the sad truth. I really do try to at least have something to say about every album I listen to and try my best to form an opinion of sorts and to go into it a little, but I’ll have to face the facts that sometimes I just can’t do it and will be faced with an album that I just have nothing to say about. I do feel bad because it is The Byrds and I was getting into their evolution as a whole and even though I recognised it as I was listening to it and felt “man this isn’t The Byrds we started with, cool, good for them” that was as far as my feelings went for it. Hopefully I’ll have more to say for their next one which is full-on Country Rock, so there’s a good chance I might.

Also, I love how there’s a horse in that fourth window on the cover. Gives me the impression that a horse was part of the band and played on this album. Don’t know about you, but the image of a horse in a recording studio playing an instrument makes me giggle.

Song of Choice: Old John Robertson

-Bosco

 

1001 Albums: Traffic

#108

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Artist: Traffic

Album: Traffic

Year: 1968

Length: 40:24

Genre: Blues Rock / Folk Rock

“Seems I got to have a change of scene
‘Cause every night I have the strangest dreams
Imprisoned by the way it could have been
Left here on my own or so it seems
I got to leave before I start to scream
But someone’s locked the door and took the key

You feelin’ alright?
I’m not feelin’ too good myself
Well, you feelin’ alright?
I’m not feelin’ too good myself”

Steve Winwood! Steve Winwood! Steve Winwood! Steve Winwood! STEVE WINWOOD!

Steve Winwood is my firetruck.

I know you absolutely no idea what that means and nope, I will not explain it to you. That’s my own special thing that I will keep to myself. And YOOOOOOOOOOU can’t do anything about it.

I’ve always been a fan of Traffic ever since I heard their song Paper Sun in my famous psychedelic music class. It’s also the only song I really ever heard by them (That and 40,00 headmen which is on this album), but I really liked it. SO I guess you could say I’m a pretty hardcore fan. One song is more than enough to know to be a fan. Right? RIGHT?!?!?!

I always liked Steve Winwood’s solo stuff even though the only song I really know is Valerie. I used to date a girl with that name and annoy her with that song. It was funny. So you know you can say Steve Winwood has really played a massive role in my life in many, many ways.

I listened to this album twice because I loved it so much, and not because I was doing the dishes the first time around and didn’t really hear the music that much because of the running water and felt it necessary to take a second listen to. No sirree, not at all. You better believe it.

In all fairness, I actually reall did love this album. It was the first time I got to listen to an entire album’s worth of Traffic music and I was very pleased with the journey it took me on. The biggest thing for me was how well it flowed from one song to another. Even with varying tunes, it managed to create seamless transitions form song to song where sometimes I didn’t even know if a new song started or not. I had to check to make sure. And despite it 40 minute length, it never felt that long. When the final song has come to an end I felt disappointed there wasn’t more. Maybe it’s because the final song didn’t really feel like a final song and didn’t give the album closure, but maybe it’s also because it was just a great listen that left you wanting more. Whichever is the truth is up to interpretation.

It’s always great when an album starts off with the band asking you to join them and sing along. Like they’re taking your hand and bringing you on a journey. They definitely sucked me in like that and boy was it a journey. I couldn’t tell if it was a happy or sad one though, for the most part the music seemed rather upbeat but lyrically I was getting some pretty depressing narratives. I always love that blend of cheery sadness in music and Traffic seemed to pull it off quite well. It left a sadness in my heart but a bounce in my step, which left me confused emotionally but pleasantly so. I mean where else are you gonna hear a song about a 13 year old homeless girl who gives herself up really easily to a fun beat? Probably lot’s of places (Zappa’s Teenage Prostitute comes to mind) but here it just fits the over-arcing vibe of the album. The song Feelin’ Alright resonated with me personally and as usual with these kinds of things, felt like it was putting into words certain emotions I was going through. it’s always nice to find something like that.

With a nice blend of pop tunes and more complex arrangements, the band seems to be really tight here, working together to support each other. There’s some fantastic flute solos here and there and some great organ sounds at points that add texture to the music. If this is folk rock, then it’s exactly the kind of folk rock I would love to hear more of and thankfully Traffic and Steve Winwood appear more on this list, so I will definitely be looking forward to that.

Song of Choice: Feelin’ Alright?

-Bosco

 

 

 

1001 Albums: Sunshine Superman

#98

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Artist: Donovan

Album: Sunshine Superman

Year: 1966

Length: 42:59

Genre: Psychedelic Folk

“Sunshine came softly through my a-window today
Could’ve tripped out easy a-but I’ve a-changed my ways
It’ll take time, I know it but in a while
You’re gonna be mine, I know it, we’ll do it in style
‘Cause I made my mind up you’re going to be mine”

Wait… Hold up a minute… Am I reading this correctly? What the hell is going on? I must be going crazy here. This can’t be right. Does that say… 1966? 1966?!?!? 19 fucking 66??? I spent all this time listening to album after album in 1967 only to be setback to 1966?? How is this even possible? How do they order these fucking albums on this list? I always thought it was chronologically but now I don’t know what to believe anymore. Just when I thought I was making it to the end it turns around and goes in reverse. What, is the next album back in the 50s? Will I hear something from the 40s? Doesn’t make any sense but at this point I would believe it could happen.

I digress.

What truly is amazing is that I’m making two posts in one day. That rarely ever happens. I usually try to avoid that because one of the two entries always gets lost in the ether of the internet doomed to only a small amount of views. But I need to catch up, I’m already halfway through the next album and don’t want to get bogged down with all the posts I need to write and also I don’t want to forget the album itself either. When you listen to an album once and listen to many others after, it’s easy to not really remember it that much, unless it really captivated you in some way, and even then my memory isn’t the greatest. I’ll remember loving it but ask me to recreate the songs and I will barely remember how they sounded. Sounds odd but it makes sense because I remember how I felt while listening more than the details of the song.

That kind of happened with this album. I remember listening to it and the general feeling of the whole album I had while listening to it, but I can’t remember the details of it. This actually happens with most albums I listen to but it was especially with this one. It’s another mix of Psychedelic folk that I guess I just wasn’t that crazy about. Loved it with Jefferson Airplane but here Donovan really takes the folk root with some long (one going as far as 7 damn minutes) and repetitive tunes that feel like a bore and a struggle to get through. Thankfully he contrasts those tunes with some fantastic ones, with Sunshine Superman and Season of the Witch clearly being the stand-out ones, and a fun folk tune called The Trip that even though is long and repetitive, it’s upbeat enough to keep you engaged the whole way through, it never feels boring is what I’m saying.

The psychedelic tunes are easily the best songs on this album and although a lot of the folk tunes delve into medieval imagery and stylings, which if you’ve read my posts you know I am a sucker for medieval things, no idea why. That’s something I’ll eventually look into. But really isn’t important at the moment… is it? I don’t think so… no, it isn’t…

As I was saying, even though the folk tunes still captured an image of something that captivates me I still found it a bit of a struggle to make my way through them (Legend of a Girl Child Linda comes to mind). But what really makes up for it is Donovan’s delivery of his vocals. He’s a damn good singer and sings with a youthful quality that really adds to the whole experience. Even if you don’t like the music at least his vocals will win you over.

So as a whole the album is really hit and miss, but the high points are really strong and well worth the time invested. I have a strong feeling this album was mainly included for its two biggest songs, but Donovan does seem to blend psychedelic with folk in a really strong way and it’s nice to hear some well needed sitar sprinkled throughout. I’ll always feel half and half about this album, but at least the half I do like I really like and that’s all that matters to me.

Song of Choice: Season of the Witch

-Bosco

 

1001 Albums: Surrealistic Pillow

#96

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Artist: Jefferson Airplane

Album: Surrealistic Pillow

Year: 1967

Length: 34: 48

Genre: Psychedelic Rock / Folk Rock

“When the truth is found
To be lies
And all the joy
Within you dies

Don’t you want somebody to love
Don’t you need somebody to love
Wouldn’t you love somebody to love
You better find somebody to love, love”
Winter has been slowly approaching. Temperatures have dropped considerably forcing me to pull out my tuque and scarf and wear my oversized winter coat. But do you think I’d wear any boots? Of course not, Converse all year, every day. I also don’t own a pair of boots so that kind of factors in to the whole not wearing boots thing. You would think I’d be prepared for winter seeing as I lived in Montreal my whole life where winters are pretty brutal, but the exact opposite effect has occurred. I’m so used to it I’ve trained myself to survive through it with the least amount of effort. I hate boots, absolutely hate them. They’re clunky and big and just awkward. The least amount of time I can go without wearing them, the happier I will be.
I digress, I’m not here to talk about boots and winter. I’m here to talk about albums. A whole list of albums from 1967 it seems because I feel like I’ve been stuck in this year for eternity. It never ends. Everytime I think I’m closer to the end, it just swoops me back in. 1967 must have been one hell of a year for music because it’s like the never-ending story here with musical albums. Maybe it’s not actually that bad and my perception is just a little warped due to not listening to the albums as frequently, but I’m so close to the 70s that I just want the 60s to end so I can move on. I don’t think I can take anymore psychedelic albums. I mean, they were great at first because they felt like a break from all the pop music from the early 60s and just added a little flavour to something different, but now I feel like I’m stuck in the flower power era of hippies and acid and t feels like it just goes on and on.
It’s funny you would expect me to hate this album since it’s a mix of folk rock and psych music with a heavy-dose of flower power hippie ideals and the age of the summer of love and woodstock feelings. A great ombination for me to just despise. But, I actually love this album very much. I was already a huge fan of their big hit “Somebody To Love” a song I was widely addicted to for a very long time and their other hit “White Rabbit” brings back memories to such a memorable scene in a movie I love, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, so Surrealistic Pillow is the exception to the rule for me I guess.
Ok, so I could probably do away with some of the pure folk tunes. Especially the ones near the beginning like My Best Friend and Today. It’s such a tonal shift after the first two songs that it really took me out of the album. Started strong only to transition into two pretty cheesy songs that I feel just don’t fit in with some of the rest of the tunes. The best music off the album was either their high-energy folk tunes or their blend of folk and psych tunes, the pure folk stuff feels like filler and just brings the album down since it doesn’t really add anything new and stands out as bad especially compared to the rest of the album.
That being said, the good tunes are really good and hit nice and hard into your ears. The title Surrealistic Pillow gives me the idea that it’s supposed to be some sort of acid dream, where you fall asleep and let your mind get lost into a drug-induced trip. I don’t know if they achieved that here but there is definitely a dream like quality to it that you can just lie down and get lost to throughout. I don’t know, either way it’s a great album and considered the quintessential album of the 60s counter culture, so that’s gotta mean something.
Now excuse me while I enjoy some pancakes and mentally prepare myself to brave the cold.
Song of Choice: Somebody to Love
-Bosco

1001 Albums: Goodbye & Hello

#86

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Artist: Tim Buckley

Album: Goodbye & Hello

Year: 1967

Length: 42:41

Genre: Folk Rock / Psychedelic Rock

If you tell me a lie I’ll cry for you
Tell me of sin and I’ll laugh
If you tell me of all the pain you’ve had
I’ll never smile again

Everywhere there’s rain my love
Everywhere there’s fear”

Ever wake up having one of those existential crises? You know which one I’m talking about? The doubt of where you are in your life, what you’re currently doing with you life. That fear of where you’re headed and what you’ll become. That feeling that you haven’t made a name for yourself at your age even though you thought you’d have way more to your name by now. That feeling of existential dread that you might never amount to anything and continue to feel the way you are.

That one.

I mean, it’s not as bad as it seems. We’ve all gone through those feelings. We’ve all been afraid of our own futures and worried about where we were headed and what we’ll become in our lives. As anything, you stop yourself and realise that you’re the master of your own destiny (unless of course everything is in fact pre-determined in our lives and no matter what we do we can’t change that… but that’s pretty depressing to think about). All we can really do is keep moving forward, learn to better ourselves and become stronger as people and continue to grow. And most importantly, get off our asses and go out and do the things we want to do, no matter how scary.

Easier said than done of course, but possible no matter how difficult. Easier for some, harder for others. At the end of the day we all have our own struggles, the biggest difference is whether we choose to let them over-consume us and control our lives or choose to move past them and come out stronger and bigger than you were before. It’s tougher but I would choose the latter every time.

I woke up with that feeling the other morning after two months of not having that feeling, I guess I was due for it. I don’t know if it’s because I’m 25 and going through a sort of quarter life crisis and just terrified of what am I gonna do with my life, or because I’m just an incredibly anxious person who overthinks everything, either way it was there and kind of shook me up. I realised I sort of need to get up and move… which is taking baby steps, but I feel like if I keep going, things will work out for sure.

This was meant to be more inspiring than sad, but whatever, take from it what you will, I have an album to listen to.

I know absolutely nothing about Tim Buckley and the wikipedia page for this album really has nothing to say so I’m going in absolutely blind with this one. I’m about four songs in and already I’m starting to see the uniqueness that is Tim Buckley. As I’ve said in previous posts, Folk is not my favourite or strongest genre of music, however, Tim seems to completely redefine what it means to be Folk by blending in all these psychedelic qualities to it without ever becoming psychedelic music itself. It’s still very much folk rock all around.

I honestly don’t really know what to say. I am at a loss of words in a lot of ways. Not because it’s boring or uninspiring, far from it actually, it’s a really fascinating album, but because it’s such a unique take on an old genre that I really have no idea how to express it. This ain’t Bob Dylan’s Folk rock, I’ll tell you that. Odd sound effects, trippy, mythical lyrics, strange effects added to the instruments, it’s like what folk rock would be if it tripped on acid. Just a little acid though. Heck, the song that just passed was called Hallucinations… sure felt like one too.

This seems to be one of those albums on the list that were for the most part forgotten or ignored when first released but in retrospect garnered a huge respect and following. The little critique I read called it groundbreaking and revolutionary, which as each tune goes by, I can definitely feel that sentiment. Nothing I’ve listened to has quite been like this and it really stands as being it’s own thing. Even Tim Buckley’s voice, which I honestly thought was a woman singing for a second, is quite unique and adds that extra layer to the music that really makes it pop. But not pop as in popping a balloon or popping corn… that would be ridiculous…

Speaking of popping corn. My friends somehow convinced me to go see It this week. I know that doesn’t seem like a big deal to lots of you, but to those who know me know that it is. I don’t hate Horror movies, I actually have a lot of rspect for them and have been trying to watch all the classics to broaden my movie knowledge in general. But Horror movies don’t sit well with me. Already being an incredibly anxious person and scared of the dark, watching a horror movie is the perfect recipe for making sure I have sleepless nights and nightmares. Can’t control that, has always been that way since I saw Halloween H20 in grade five. Why did an elementary school teacher think it was ok to show this movie to a class of 10 – 12 year olds is beyond me. Lack of judgement? Probably, but then again I had the choice to not watch it if I really wanted to. My curiosity had the better of me. My curiosity seems to do that to me. Screw me over emotionally all the time. You think I’d have learned by now, but nope. Lesson is… never listen to your curiosity. There’s a reason the expression Curiosity killed the cat is a thing. I mean, curiosity is good when used well… but I’ve come to a point that it makes me want to know every detail of everything and believe me… some things… you just don’t want to know. *SHUDDERS*

So yeah, It was good. Thoroughly enjoyed it, didn’t find it scary. Creepy at times for sure, but never scary. Nice story about facing your fears and overcoming them, which is a moral I kind of needed slapped in my face at that moment (no joke).

I’m not here to do a movie review though. Actually I’m not here to review anything technically. I know my posts have slowly become reviews as I listen to more and more albums and get a slightly better ear when it comes to music, but I remember my initial intentions always being about chronicling the journey of listening to the albums, not critiquing them. It’s honestly hard not too. How do you talk about an album without breaking it apart? Especially in a review-like setting? Oh well, I do what I do what I do what I do.

Three songs are left on the album and I still don’t have a favourite. I feel this might be one of those where I have difficulty picking a song of choice. Usually it’s for albums I didn’t really care for and I always feel like following up the song of choice with a little (…I guess) because at that point I just had to pick something. In this case, that’s not the case. I feel a little mesmerised by the whole experience of this album that… I’m not sure exactly what to pinpoint out of it all.

I’m for sure overselling the album a bit, but you have to put it into context. I just went from psychedelic music and The fucking Monkees to suddenly be met with this piece of majestic folk rock. And I’m not joking about majestic, with all the themes of kings and queens and castles. The song of the same name as the album is an 8-minute epic that illustrates imagery of lutes and fools and knights.┬áTim Buckley almost sounds like a modern day bard playing on the green of the castle, telling medieval style stories to the local peasants.

oh… I think I got it now… cool.

Song of Choice: Goodbye and Hello

-Bosco