1001 Albums: Traffic

#108

Album_108_Original

Artist: Traffic

Album: Traffic

Year: 1968

Length: 40:24

Genre: Blues Rock / Folk Rock

“Seems I got to have a change of scene
‘Cause every night I have the strangest dreams
Imprisoned by the way it could have been
Left here on my own or so it seems
I got to leave before I start to scream
But someone’s locked the door and took the key

You feelin’ alright?
I’m not feelin’ too good myself
Well, you feelin’ alright?
I’m not feelin’ too good myself”

Steve Winwood! Steve Winwood! Steve Winwood! Steve Winwood! STEVE WINWOOD!

Steve Winwood is my firetruck.

I know you absolutely no idea what that means and nope, I will not explain it to you. That’s my own special thing that I will keep to myself. And YOOOOOOOOOOU can’t do anything about it.

I’ve always been a fan of Traffic ever since I heard their song Paper Sun in my famous psychedelic music class. It’s also the only song I really ever heard by them (That and 40,00 headmen which is on this album), but I really liked it. SO I guess you could say I’m a pretty hardcore fan. One song is more than enough to know to be a fan. Right? RIGHT?!?!?!

I always liked Steve Winwood’s solo stuff even though the only song I really know is Valerie. I used to date a girl with that name and annoy her with that song. It was funny. So you know you can say Steve Winwood has really played a massive role in my life in many, many ways.

I listened to this album twice because I loved it so much, and not because I was doing the dishes the first time around and didn’t really hear the music that much because of the running water and felt it necessary to take a second listen to. No sirree, not at all. You better believe it.

In all fairness, I actually reall did love this album. It was the first time I got to listen to an entire album’s worth of Traffic music and I was very pleased with the journey it took me on. The biggest thing for me was how well it flowed from one song to another. Even with varying tunes, it managed to create seamless transitions form song to song where sometimes I didn’t even know if a new song started or not. I had to check to make sure. And despite it 40 minute length, it never felt that long. When the final song has come to an end I felt disappointed there wasn’t more. Maybe it’s because the final song didn’t really feel like a final song and didn’t give the album closure, but maybe it’s also because it was just a great listen that left you wanting more. Whichever is the truth is up to interpretation.

It’s always great when an album starts off with the band asking you to join them and sing along. Like they’re taking your hand and bringing you on a journey. They definitely sucked me in like that and boy was it a journey. I couldn’t tell if it was a happy or sad one though, for the most part the music seemed rather upbeat but lyrically I was getting some pretty depressing narratives. I always love that blend of cheery sadness in music and Traffic seemed to pull it off quite well. It left a sadness in my heart but a bounce in my step, which left me confused emotionally but pleasantly so. I mean where else are you gonna hear a song about a 13 year old homeless girl who gives herself up really easily to a fun beat? Probably lot’s of places (Zappa’s Teenage Prostitute comes to mind) but here it just fits the over-arcing vibe of the album. The song Feelin’ Alright resonated with me personally and as usual with these kinds of things, felt like it was putting into words certain emotions I was going through. it’s always nice to find something like that.

With a nice blend of pop tunes and more complex arrangements, the band seems to be really tight here, working together to support each other. There’s some fantastic flute solos here and there and some great organ sounds at points that add texture to the music. If this is folk rock, then it’s exactly the kind of folk rock I would love to hear more of and thankfully Traffic and Steve Winwood appear more on this list, so I will definitely be looking forward to that.

Song of Choice: Feelin’ Alright?

-Bosco

 

 

 

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1001 Albums: Sunshine Superman

#98

Album_98_Original

Artist: Donovan

Album: Sunshine Superman

Year: 1966

Length: 42:59

Genre: Psychedelic Folk

“Sunshine came softly through my a-window today
Could’ve tripped out easy a-but I’ve a-changed my ways
It’ll take time, I know it but in a while
You’re gonna be mine, I know it, we’ll do it in style
‘Cause I made my mind up you’re going to be mine”

Wait… Hold up a minute… Am I reading this correctly? What the hell is going on? I must be going crazy here. This can’t be right. Does that say… 1966? 1966?!?!? 19 fucking 66??? I spent all this time listening to album after album in 1967 only to be setback to 1966?? How is this even possible? How do they order these fucking albums on this list? I always thought it was chronologically but now I don’t know what to believe anymore. Just when I thought I was making it to the end it turns around and goes in reverse. What, is the next album back in the 50s? Will I hear something from the 40s? Doesn’t make any sense but at this point I would believe it could happen.

I digress.

What truly is amazing is that I’m making two posts in one day. That rarely ever happens. I usually try to avoid that because one of the two entries always gets lost in the ether of the internet doomed to only a small amount of views. But I need to catch up, I’m already halfway through the next album and don’t want to get bogged down with all the posts I need to write and also I don’t want to forget the album itself either. When you listen to an album once and listen to many others after, it’s easy to not really remember it that much, unless it really captivated you in some way, and even then my memory isn’t the greatest. I’ll remember loving it but ask me to recreate the songs and I will barely remember how they sounded. Sounds odd but it makes sense because I remember how I felt while listening more than the details of the song.

That kind of happened with this album. I remember listening to it and the general feeling of the whole album I had while listening to it, but I can’t remember the details of it. This actually happens with most albums I listen to but it was especially with this one. It’s another mix of Psychedelic folk that I guess I just wasn’t that crazy about. Loved it with Jefferson Airplane but here Donovan really takes the folk root with some long (one going as far as 7 damn minutes) and repetitive tunes that feel like a bore and a struggle to get through. Thankfully he contrasts those tunes with some fantastic ones, with Sunshine Superman and Season of the Witch clearly being the stand-out ones, and a fun folk tune called The Trip that even though is long and repetitive, it’s upbeat enough to keep you engaged the whole way through, it never feels boring is what I’m saying.

The psychedelic tunes are easily the best songs on this album and although a lot of the folk tunes delve into medieval imagery and stylings, which if you’ve read my posts you know I am a sucker for medieval things, no idea why. That’s something I’ll eventually look into. But really isn’t important at the moment… is it? I don’t think so… no, it isn’t…

As I was saying, even though the folk tunes still captured an image of something that captivates me I still found it a bit of a struggle to make my way through them (Legend of a Girl Child Linda comes to mind). But what really makes up for it is Donovan’s delivery of his vocals. He’s a damn good singer and sings with a youthful quality that really adds to the whole experience. Even if you don’t like the music at least his vocals will win you over.

So as a whole the album is really hit and miss, but the high points are really strong and well worth the time invested. I have a strong feeling this album was mainly included for its two biggest songs, but Donovan does seem to blend psychedelic with folk in a really strong way and it’s nice to hear some well needed sitar sprinkled throughout. I’ll always feel half and half about this album, but at least the half I do like I really like and that’s all that matters to me.

Song of Choice: Season of the Witch

-Bosco

 

1001 Albums: Surrealistic Pillow

#96

Album_96_Original

Artist: Jefferson Airplane

Album: Surrealistic Pillow

Year: 1967

Length: 34: 48

Genre: Psychedelic Rock / Folk Rock

“When the truth is found
To be lies
And all the joy
Within you dies

Don’t you want somebody to love
Don’t you need somebody to love
Wouldn’t you love somebody to love
You better find somebody to love, love”
Winter has been slowly approaching. Temperatures have dropped considerably forcing me to pull out my tuque and scarf and wear my oversized winter coat. But do you think I’d wear any boots? Of course not, Converse all year, every day. I also don’t own a pair of boots so that kind of factors in to the whole not wearing boots thing. You would think I’d be prepared for winter seeing as I lived in Montreal my whole life where winters are pretty brutal, but the exact opposite effect has occurred. I’m so used to it I’ve trained myself to survive through it with the least amount of effort. I hate boots, absolutely hate them. They’re clunky and big and just awkward. The least amount of time I can go without wearing them, the happier I will be.
I digress, I’m not here to talk about boots and winter. I’m here to talk about albums. A whole list of albums from 1967 it seems because I feel like I’ve been stuck in this year for eternity. It never ends. Everytime I think I’m closer to the end, it just swoops me back in. 1967 must have been one hell of a year for music because it’s like the never-ending story here with musical albums. Maybe it’s not actually that bad and my perception is just a little warped due to not listening to the albums as frequently, but I’m so close to the 70s that I just want the 60s to end so I can move on. I don’t think I can take anymore psychedelic albums. I mean, they were great at first because they felt like a break from all the pop music from the early 60s and just added a little flavour to something different, but now I feel like I’m stuck in the flower power era of hippies and acid and t feels like it just goes on and on.
It’s funny you would expect me to hate this album since it’s a mix of folk rock and psych music with a heavy-dose of flower power hippie ideals and the age of the summer of love and woodstock feelings. A great ombination for me to just despise. But, I actually love this album very much. I was already a huge fan of their big hit “Somebody To Love” a song I was widely addicted to for a very long time and their other hit “White Rabbit” brings back memories to such a memorable scene in a movie I love, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, so Surrealistic Pillow is the exception to the rule for me I guess.
Ok, so I could probably do away with some of the pure folk tunes. Especially the ones near the beginning like My Best Friend and Today. It’s such a tonal shift after the first two songs that it really took me out of the album. Started strong only to transition into two pretty cheesy songs that I feel just don’t fit in with some of the rest of the tunes. The best music off the album was either their high-energy folk tunes or their blend of folk and psych tunes, the pure folk stuff feels like filler and just brings the album down since it doesn’t really add anything new and stands out as bad especially compared to the rest of the album.
That being said, the good tunes are really good and hit nice and hard into your ears. The title Surrealistic Pillow gives me the idea that it’s supposed to be some sort of acid dream, where you fall asleep and let your mind get lost into a drug-induced trip. I don’t know if they achieved that here but there is definitely a dream like quality to it that you can just lie down and get lost to throughout. I don’t know, either way it’s a great album and considered the quintessential album of the 60s counter culture, so that’s gotta mean something.
Now excuse me while I enjoy some pancakes and mentally prepare myself to brave the cold.
Song of Choice: Somebody to Love
-Bosco

1001 Albums: Goodbye & Hello

#86

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Artist: Tim Buckley

Album: Goodbye & Hello

Year: 1967

Length: 42:41

Genre: Folk Rock / Psychedelic Rock

If you tell me a lie I’ll cry for you
Tell me of sin and I’ll laugh
If you tell me of all the pain you’ve had
I’ll never smile again

Everywhere there’s rain my love
Everywhere there’s fear”

Ever wake up having one of those existential crises? You know which one I’m talking about? The doubt of where you are in your life, what you’re currently doing with you life. That fear of where you’re headed and what you’ll become. That feeling that you haven’t made a name for yourself at your age even though you thought you’d have way more to your name by now. That feeling of existential dread that you might never amount to anything and continue to feel the way you are.

That one.

I mean, it’s not as bad as it seems. We’ve all gone through those feelings. We’ve all been afraid of our own futures and worried about where we were headed and what we’ll become in our lives. As anything, you stop yourself and realise that you’re the master of your own destiny (unless of course everything is in fact pre-determined in our lives and no matter what we do we can’t change that… but that’s pretty depressing to think about). All we can really do is keep moving forward, learn to better ourselves and become stronger as people and continue to grow. And most importantly, get off our asses and go out and do the things we want to do, no matter how scary.

Easier said than done of course, but possible no matter how difficult. Easier for some, harder for others. At the end of the day we all have our own struggles, the biggest difference is whether we choose to let them over-consume us and control our lives or choose to move past them and come out stronger and bigger than you were before. It’s tougher but I would choose the latter every time.

I woke up with that feeling the other morning after two months of not having that feeling, I guess I was due for it. I don’t know if it’s because I’m 25 and going through a sort of quarter life crisis and just terrified of what am I gonna do with my life, or because I’m just an incredibly anxious person who overthinks everything, either way it was there and kind of shook me up. I realised I sort of need to get up and move… which is taking baby steps, but I feel like if I keep going, things will work out for sure.

This was meant to be more inspiring than sad, but whatever, take from it what you will, I have an album to listen to.

I know absolutely nothing about Tim Buckley and the wikipedia page for this album really has nothing to say so I’m going in absolutely blind with this one. I’m about four songs in and already I’m starting to see the uniqueness that is Tim Buckley. As I’ve said in previous posts, Folk is not my favourite or strongest genre of music, however, Tim seems to completely redefine what it means to be Folk by blending in all these psychedelic qualities to it without ever becoming psychedelic music itself. It’s still very much folk rock all around.

I honestly don’t really know what to say. I am at a loss of words in a lot of ways. Not because it’s boring or uninspiring, far from it actually, it’s a really fascinating album, but because it’s such a unique take on an old genre that I really have no idea how to express it. This ain’t Bob Dylan’s Folk rock, I’ll tell you that. Odd sound effects, trippy, mythical lyrics, strange effects added to the instruments, it’s like what folk rock would be if it tripped on acid. Just a little acid though. Heck, the song that just passed was called Hallucinations… sure felt like one too.

This seems to be one of those albums on the list that were for the most part forgotten or ignored when first released but in retrospect garnered a huge respect and following. The little critique I read called it groundbreaking and revolutionary, which as each tune goes by, I can definitely feel that sentiment. Nothing I’ve listened to has quite been like this and it really stands as being it’s own thing. Even Tim Buckley’s voice, which I honestly thought was a woman singing for a second, is quite unique and adds that extra layer to the music that really makes it pop. But not pop as in popping a balloon or popping corn… that would be ridiculous…

Speaking of popping corn. My friends somehow convinced me to go see It this week. I know that doesn’t seem like a big deal to lots of you, but to those who know me know that it is. I don’t hate Horror movies, I actually have a lot of rspect for them and have been trying to watch all the classics to broaden my movie knowledge in general. But Horror movies don’t sit well with me. Already being an incredibly anxious person and scared of the dark, watching a horror movie is the perfect recipe for making sure I have sleepless nights and nightmares. Can’t control that, has always been that way since I saw Halloween H20 in grade five. Why did an elementary school teacher think it was ok to show this movie to a class of 10 – 12 year olds is beyond me. Lack of judgement? Probably, but then again I had the choice to not watch it if I really wanted to. My curiosity had the better of me. My curiosity seems to do that to me. Screw me over emotionally all the time. You think I’d have learned by now, but nope. Lesson is… never listen to your curiosity. There’s a reason the expression Curiosity killed the cat is a thing. I mean, curiosity is good when used well… but I’ve come to a point that it makes me want to know every detail of everything and believe me… some things… you just don’t want to know. *SHUDDERS*

So yeah, It was good. Thoroughly enjoyed it, didn’t find it scary. Creepy at times for sure, but never scary. Nice story about facing your fears and overcoming them, which is a moral I kind of needed slapped in my face at that moment (no joke).

I’m not here to do a movie review though. Actually I’m not here to review anything technically. I know my posts have slowly become reviews as I listen to more and more albums and get a slightly better ear when it comes to music, but I remember my initial intentions always being about chronicling the journey of listening to the albums, not critiquing them. It’s honestly hard not too. How do you talk about an album without breaking it apart? Especially in a review-like setting? Oh well, I do what I do what I do what I do.

Three songs are left on the album and I still don’t have a favourite. I feel this might be one of those where I have difficulty picking a song of choice. Usually it’s for albums I didn’t really care for and I always feel like following up the song of choice with a little (…I guess) because at that point I just had to pick something. In this case, that’s not the case. I feel a little mesmerised by the whole experience of this album that… I’m not sure exactly what to pinpoint out of it all.

I’m for sure overselling the album a bit, but you have to put it into context. I just went from psychedelic music and The fucking Monkees to suddenly be met with this piece of majestic folk rock. And I’m not joking about majestic, with all the themes of kings and queens and castles. The song of the same name as the album is an 8-minute epic that illustrates imagery of lutes and fools and knights. Tim Buckley almost sounds like a modern day bard playing on the green of the castle, telling medieval style stories to the local peasants.

oh… I think I got it now… cool.

Song of Choice: Goodbye and Hello

-Bosco

 

1001 Albums: Buffalo Springfield Again

#80

Album_80_Original

Artist: Buffalo Springfield

Album: Buffalo Springfield Again

Year: 1967

Length: 34:07

Genre: Folk Rock/Bues Rock

“Look what’s happen’ to me,
I’m going blind, please help.
There I sat until three,
Gettin’ further behind myself, by myself.
And I’m hung upside down,
And I’m hung upside down,
And I’m hung upside down,
Come on, come on,
Hung upside Down.”

I’m going to try to speed through this one. I’m quickly eating supper as I write and am off to meet some friends for karaoke a little later but I wanted to make sure I got a post in before I did. My go to song for karaoke is usually “Turning Japanese” by the Vapors and “This Town Ain’t Big Enough For The Both Of Us” by Sparks, but I might try new ones tonight, like “Ballroom Blitz” or even “Crazy Train”, who knows. Last time I did karaoke I totally slayed “Bad Touch” but completely massacred “Kiss From A Rose”. With me, you never quite know what you’re going to get.

So without delay, Buffalo Springfield…

LEGENDARY_BUFFALO.png

No, no, no… I don’t have time for puns based on the band’s name. I need to speed through this otherwise I’ll be late for karaoke and miss Luis hitting on the girl behind the bar.

This album seems to be mirroring the last one in a really weird way. I’ve currently experienced two albums in a row that have left out the band’s most popular and definitive song. This was actually brought to my attention by Sandra and Graham, who both knew the song and sounded rather disappointed that it didn’t appear on this album. And although for Country Joe and The Fish, the famous song would eventually appear on their next album, the Buffalo Springfield one had a very different path. Lots would correct me in saying, “But Hey! It appears on their first album, derpaderpadurrr…”. Which isn’t false, but it actually doesn’t appear on the original pressing and instead suddenly appeared as the opener of their debut album in a 1967 pressing, which if you’re observant is the same year that this album came out. Why didn’t they just put it on this one? Who knows. But for you’re listening pleasure, here’s the famous Vietnam protest song (yes coincidentally it’s also a Vietnam protest song like The Country Joe and The Fish one), “For What It’s Worth”:

 

There. Happy? now we can move on.

Here’s another album where I recognized a song from my Roots of Rock N Roll class, “Bluebird”, that unfortunately also didn’t get much airplay on my ipod. Why? I don’t know, other songs just took up more time and I never really gave this one a chance. I did now. It’s pretty good. Pretty Damn good.

That’s basically this album in a nutshell, damn good blues infused folk rock. I mean, you can’t fail when you have Crosby, Stills and Young writing music. Yeah, that’s right, the main dudes of Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young were here writing music before forming their super dupe power band (and before Neil Young would explode in his solo career). However, despite this, the album does feel a tad inconsistent and lacks in flow as a whole, coming off as a greatest hits compilation rather than it’s own album. If anything this is a testament to how great the music on it really is. Sure, it may not all work together as a whole, but individually they are all great tracks (except for “Sad Memory” in my opinion, which comes across as a sappy love tune that I’d skip 99% of the time). And that’s where the inconsistency comes in. Songs like “Sad Memory” and “Expecting To Fly” sound like they should be on completely different albums. Especially knowing that Neil Young rented out a studio to record “Expecting To Fly” on his own time with studio musicians who all believed it was part of his solo album. No other member of Buffalo Springfield actually appears on this song. And when you have every band member kind f just sharing in the songwriting, doing their own tunes and putting it all together, it really just adds to that compilation feel.

That being said, there’s no denying the music itself is great. “Expecting To Fly” may stick out, but in a good way, playing off as a beautiful piece of music with strings and atmosphere, a nice little break in the middle of the album. The opener “Mr. Soul” is a great upbeat blues rock song, with layered guitar performances that has you tapping your toes and “Hung Upside Down” has you hanging on, wanting to continue for more. The closer “Broken Arrow” seems to be an arrangement of live and studio performances melded together, with small breaks and pauses in the song itself. Odd choice, but works quite well.

That’s all I have to say for now. Going to finish my supper and run off to Karaoke. Block your ears, you’ll be in for an unpleasant night.

Song of Choice: Hung Upside Down

-Bosco

1001 Albums: Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme

#71

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Artist: Simon and Garfunkel

Album: Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme

Year: 1966

Length: 29:14

Genre: Folk Rock

“In the early evening gloom
Impaled on my wall
My eyes can dimly see
The pattern of my life
And the puzzle that is me”

Isn’t it great when you discover something you didn’t think you’d enjoy but found yourself loving it very much? I find myself doing that a lot these days. I think it’s great. It’s not only giving me the opportunity to find and enjoy new things but also allowing me to expand my knowledge on things I love (Mainly movies and music). In the past week I got to watch the Italian Neo-realist film, Bicycle Thieves and despite the lackluster response from the class, it really grabbed my attention. So much that I watched it a second time to see it again. I never knew much about the neo-realist movement in Italy but that film alone made me want to explore the movement and in the span of the next month I will probably be checking out more films.

This album did the same thing. I was never really crazy about Simon and Garfunkel. I kind of entered this album indifferently, no high or low expectations, just another album on the list to listen to. Little did I know I would be surprised by the fact that I would actually love it. I’ve said it before and probably won’t be the last time I’ll say it, but I’ve never really been crazy about folk music. I’m happy to say since I’ve started this list my opinions on folk has changed and I find myself slowly starting to enjoy it more than I used to. I guess I always misjudged it and this album is a perfect example of that.

I wish I hadn’t made some preconceived notions of what I felt Simon and Garfunkel to be. The little I heard of them I honestly found them boring, but as my musical tastes have been expanding and I’ve had more of an open-mind towards all genre, I now realise this duo were much more than I thought they were. What I used to brush off as slow and uninteresting acoustic music was actually emotional and kinda beautiful. These two have managed to create music that connects with you, with underlying themes of alienation, loneliness and melancholia with songs that ask questions about life and meaning. When they’re not taking a more straight-forward approach, singing with haunting vocals and sorrowful guitar accompaniment, they’re taking a page from Bob Dylan and adding that bitter-sweet flavour, upbeat music with sad themes. There’s no denying the duo has considerable talent and this album is a great showcase of what they can do.

Right from the beginning, the listener is met with the incredibly haunting “Scarborough Fair/ Canticle”. The duo sings in the most eerie sounding harmonies, that overlap and come together to make a chilling and beautiful song. From there, the first half of this album did something I really liked, created an amazing progression of musical styles. From “Scarborough Fair/ Canticle” to “The Big Bright Green Pleasure Machine”, it slowly grows more and more upbeat instrumentally. It’s a nice steady progression as it builds up becoming more and more exciting as every song goes by. The build-up is done so masterfully and cleverly that it makes the first half one of the most cohesive side a’s I’ve ever heard.

When side B comes along, it’s a little more all over the place, taking elements from all the songs in side A but mixing them up in a different order so it doesn’t flow as well, but still provides some really strong material. One song in particular, “A Simple Desultory Philippic” stands out a bit for being different than the rest. Here, Paul Simon does his best to sound like Bob Dylan and openly satirises pop culture phenomenon that has been happening at the time. Whether he’s openly mocking Dylan or praising him is hard to tell and while the ranting can be humorous at times, you don’t know if he’s against it or just poking fun at it. The side eventually ends with “7 O’Clock News/Silent Night” which mirrors the eeriness of the opening, but this time through collage and juxtaposition rather than haunting harmonies. Mixed in with their pretty vocals of “Silent Night” is news coverage from big events that were occurring at the time (Like the Vietnam War). The contrast of happy Christmas sentiments with the sad news makes for a chilling song, especially as the news reports slowly get louder and the vocals get quieter as the song progresses.

This marked an interesting time for the duo. Their last album was incredibly underwhelming causing the duo to take full control of their music for this one. Unsure of where to go with their music, they decided to take a step back into what they felt was familiar territory and took some of Paul Simon’s old arrangements from a solo project he had years back. Honestly, that was a smart move on their part because the end result was an album that widely connected with the youth, having themes that they could easily relate to and they managed to create an album that is timeless. Although some songs do date them, with references of being super groovy and as a piece of the 60s flower power movement, their few and far between and don’t take away from the rest of the album.

This has been a happy discovery and like Dylan before them, I’m actually excited to see what they’ll have next in store for me (They appear a few more times on this list).

Song of Choice: The Big Bright Green Pleasure Machine

-Bosco

 

1001 Albums: If You Can Believe Your Eyes and Ears

#67

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Artist: The Mama’s and the Papa’s

Album: If You Can Believe Your Eyes and Ears

Year: 1966

Length: 33:42

Genre: Pop Rock/Folk Rock/Sunshine Pop

“Got a feelin’ that you’re playing some game with me babe
Got a feelin’ that you just can’t see
If you’re entertaining any thought that you’re gaining
By causing me all of this pain and making me blue
The joke on you”

I have officially signed a lease and am moving in to my very own apartment within a week. It’s exciting stuff. No more mooching off my cousins, now I will truly be an independent adult. Free to do whatever I want whenever I want (within the limits of the law and my monthly budget). Finally I can see what it feels to be a full-functioning adult… alone with the pressures of the world and society crashing down on me and the burden of the sudden influx in bills to pay. I can’t wait.

So, that’s one thing of my checklist and a weight off my shoulders. Now all I need is a job and I’ll be set for now. It’s surprising how easy yet difficult it has become to get a job. I think I’ve sent my CV to a good 30 places and only heard from roughly two. I keep getting emails that say my application has been viewed… but then hear nothing from that company. Oh well… Isn’t it funny how you’re always told to go to places in person because it shows determination and perseverance but when you do go they tell you to apply online? Getting a lot of mixed signals from everyone. You’re always told to do one thing and then when you do it they tell you another but then you’re supposed to do the first thing because people like that, yet they don’t like it either. What the fuck… no wonder we’re so confused all the time.

I’ll give myself a mental break from that because I have to tell you guys about The Mama’s and the Papa’s. Oh man, these guys. Monday Monday and California Dreamin’ were two songs that were part of my childhood song diary that played on my dad’s music compilations. I used to hear both those songs so many damn times, they’re part of the repertoire of music engraved in my head forever. Not complaining, I actually enjoyed those songs. When I was a kid and was attending day camp during the summer, my group actually performed a dance routine to California Dreamin’ that I got a little to into that it garnered some weird looks from the other kids. Hey, don’t hate cause I love to dance.

I find this album is really a testament of it’s time. A lens into a specific group of people circa 1966. This whole album just reaks of hippie flower-power folk rock that it can turn you off if you’re really not into it. That’s kind of a shame because musically it delivers with particular attention to the harmonies created by the four members of the band, specifically Mama Cass and Michelle Phillips, who, when blended together, create angelic harmonies that can only please your ears.

If you don’t pay attention you might miss some of the lyrical content, which is easy to assume is just your typical love cheese. Being catered for their hippie love, the lyrical content kind of grasps every aspect of the flower power lifestyle: Peace, Love and Promiscuous sex. That’s right, it’s a little shocking what they sing about at times (mostly for the time they came out) that there were nerves when it came to selling the album. Heck, the album cover itself garnered enough controversy and it’s only crime was it featured a toilet on it. Oh no, not a toilet. It’s interesting to see how The Mamas and The Papas are considered a little risque, especially when considered to today. I guess companies were run by very conservative people who didn’t like the idea of sleeping around being thrown out there. God forbid people like sex.

I got to say though, as much as Michelle Phillips is a bomb shell, I wouldn’t be surprised if Mama Cass was the one getting way more action. Her singing voice, with that rare soprano quality, was enough to get any man to cream his pants and I’m sure everyone’s wanted that experience with a BBW. For larger woman, she was definitely a good role model as she proved size and weight didn’t matter and you can still be a banging lady.

mama cass

Don’t lie, you would.

So, this got oddly sexual, but hey can you blame me? That was a big thing for the hippies. The sexual revolution was a big deal and changed how people viewed the act. No longer was it a taboo subject to hush in giggled whispers, they normalised it as a fun thing that everyone enjoys and removed the judgements that came with it. And STDs… that was a big thing to… probably should have used condoms buddies.

Whatever your stance on it, approve or dissaprove, it was still a big part of the 60s and this album is a nice time capsule to that era. From the musical vibes to the themes of the music, it really grabs your hand and takes you back to that time to experience it for yourself.

I’ll end this with something humorous for your viewing pleasure. French and Saunders did a style parody of The Mamas and The Papas on their tv show back in the 90s (early 2000s?) and I think they captured their style almost perfectly. Man, I love these two ladies:

 

Song of Choice: California Dreamin’

-Bosco