1001 Albums: Disraeli Gears

#88

Album_88_Original 2

Artist: Cream

Album: Disraeli Gears

Year: 1967

Length: 33:37

Genre: Psychedelic Rock / Blues Rock

“It’s getting near dawn,
When lights close their tired eyes
I’ll soon be with you my love,
To give you my dawn surprise
I’ll be with you darling soon,
I’ll be with you when the stars start falling”

My mood’s been kind of weird these days, hitting a bit of a down. Not going to go into details so I’m going to try my best to stick to talking about Cream.

Cream was a nice little treat for my otherwise crappy day. I already knew their big hit “Sunshine of my Love’ thanks to Guitar Hero and just… you know life in general. It’s a pretty big song for them, hard not to have heard it at all unless you’ve been living under a rock. I actually didn’t expect it to suddenly come on… I mean I should have, but I didn’t look ahead or even think about it in general, so when it came on I definitely got excited. You know the type of excitement when  a song you know plays and you’re all like “Hey I know that song! I KNOW IT! EVERYONE I HAVE HEARD THIS SONG!!!!!!! HEY!!!! HEEEEYYYYY!!!!!” I was alone so screaming that out didn’t really have much purpose or effect in general.

As much as the band was trying to get away from their blues rock roots, they still managed to incorporate it with their new psychedelic sound they were aiming for,  creating a nice blend of both styles. Was nice to hear Eric Clapton again after hearing him on The Bluesbreakers album. I should have know it was him just based on the sound of the guitar work, which is very much his own sound, but I never caught on it seems. To be honest I should have just known he played on Cream in general because that’s just general music knowledge but whatever we all have brain farts once in awhile. My point is, it was nice to hear him play again. I know a lot of people aren’t crazy about Eric Clapton but there’s no denying he does what he does very well and can really create a guitar groove that you can get lost in.

Musically I feel I don’t really have much to say. For the most part it’s just some really good shit. I thoroughly enjoyed it from start to finish and didn’t find a weak moment in the whole album. It was such a treat to sit through this album and feel myself grooving to Ginger Baker’s drum beats and Eric Clapton’s solos. The song writing is overall damn solid and the album really evokes a mixture of the summer of love with some hard rock sensibilities which I’d take over any type of hippie-dippie music any day. It’s like if you grabbed everything good about it and pumped it up to make it rock a little more then you would probably have Cream… probably. I honestly don’t know what I’m talking about.

There’s some interesting stories surrounding this album. Ok, not that interesting but more… amusing. One interesting note is that they actually recorded this album in a record three days which if you have heard the album know that’s one hell of an impressive feat. I think they were on a race with time because apparently their work visas expired their final recording day, so they really had to crank this out as quickly and efficiently as they could. Well, it definitely paid off because the final result is simply amazing.

Another funny story is where the title came from. I mean, Disraeli Gears is a rather odd title for an album and isn’t mentioned anywhere in any of the songs or seems to have anything to do with the album. According to Ginger Baker it was a slip of the tongue by one of the roadies who called the Derailleur Gears racing bikes Disraeli Gears by accident. The band found it so funny that they just had to name their album that. What do you expect from a band who gave themselves such a self-indulgent band name. We all know they named themselves Cream from the expression “Cream always rises to the top” to show off their over-confidence as a band. I guess they just knew they were the top of the top. Or at least believed that. Maybe not the top, but definitely up there.

I’m going to start mentally preparing myself for the next album, which I am not looking forward to at all. Until then, I’ll try to keep Cream in my mind to keep me sane.

Song of Choice: SWALBR

-Bosco

 

Advertisements

1001 Albums: Safe As Milk

#81

Album_81_Original

Artist: Captain Beefheart and His Magic Band

Album: Safe As Milk

Year: 1967

Length: 33:40

Genre: Blues Rock / Acid Rock / Garage Rock

“Singin through you to me
Thunderbolts caught easily
Shouts the truth peacefully
Electricity”

I know what everyone is thinking and believe me I know you want to know. I told myself I wouldn’t but I know at this moment you’re all aching to find out and you won’t be satisfied until I acknowledge it. That’s fine, but I can’t always do this for you guys but I will make an exception this one time. I know you’re all dying to know… how did I do in karaoke on Friday? I realise I mentioned it in my last post and it left you guys aching for me to talk about it and I kind of felt it was either irrelevant or just didn’t really fit with this particular blog post. But looking back on all my posts I consistently talked about life and things that had absolutely nothing to do with the album so I figured what the hell, why not.

I absolutely slayed in karaoke. I killed it. I was nervous because the last time I went I butchered it but this time around I just tore it apart. I started the night with “Ballroom Blitz”, nothing great, just a ton of fun. Second song, I killed. sang ABC’s “Poison Arrow” and just owned it as my own. It was sad that nobody really knew the song, but I did well enough that it did not matter. Unfortunately with my next tune I didn’t do as well. Sang Elvis Costello’s “Radio Radio”. Fantastic tune but unfortunately I followed to assholes who chose to sing “Bohemian Rhapsody” which honestly there’s an unwritten rule that unless the whole bar is doing it together you do not pick that fucking song. Following that with a song that barely anyone knew wasn’t great and I did ok… but I got to sing it which was all I wanted. About an hour later me, Luis and Aziz broke out into “TubThumping” where I samg all the female vocals and immediately got to sing my final song, Abba’s “Does Your Mother Know”, another I’ve been wanting to belt out for a long time and never did.

There, happy? That was my night.

what?

What more do you want?

Oh…

Oh right…. Safe As Milk. I forgot… I actually listened to an album by Captain Beefheart.

beefheart.jpg

An early photo of him when he was just a cabin boy.

Ok, I promise I’ll stop making these band name puns… maybe…

Despite what it sounds like I actually really love this album. My biggest problem (which is unrelated to the album itself) is that I’ve just been so tired these past few days that I barely remember much details of this album. I can definitely talk about the general feelings I had for it, but specifics are going to be really difficult at this moment. I’m adding this album to the revisit list and will eventually give it a relisten and a second blog post because my current feelings and mood just will not give it the justice it deserves.

So what can I say about it? It’s definitely it’s own thing. There’s no denying Captain Beefheart and his Magic Band managed to create something that is uniquely their own. Heavily influenced by Blues Rock, they managed to take on the genre and tackle it in a completely unconventional and unique way to the point that their original label dropped them for being too unconventional (Due to the song “Electricity” in particular). He also seems to take a page from the book of Zappa (which makes sense since he was a part of Zappa’s band) incorporating weird time signatures, strange noises, sound clips (such as a radio host introducing one of the songs), unusual and surreal lyrics and funny singing voices. If you love Zappa, Beefheart should definitely be one to check out.

I actually heard some people express they find Beefheart harder to get into than Zappa, Beefheart surprisingly somehow being more alienating. I don’t know if I agree with that. Maybe Beefheart’s later work gets a little more difficult to the ears, but this one feels way more accessible than Zappa’s work, incorporating enough weirdness to stick out but still remaining traditional enough to keep the average listener hooked. Maybe it’s just because I like the unconventional but this was definitely one of the top listening experiences I had on this list so far, so we’ll see once Trout Mask Replica hits us if I still feel the same way.

So there you have it, don’t really have much to say at the moment which is a real shame because I really loved this album but my mind has been so bogged down and cloudy this past week for so many reasons that it was really difficult to form any sort of coherent analysis or critique, especially for an album of this caliber.

So until I revisit it, check it out for yourself and enjoy the kookiness that is Captain Beefheart.

Song of Choice: Dropout Boogie

-Bosco

 

 

1001 Albums: Buffalo Springfield Again

#80

Album_80_Original

Artist: Buffalo Springfield

Album: Buffalo Springfield Again

Year: 1967

Length: 34:07

Genre: Folk Rock/Bues Rock

“Look what’s happen’ to me,
I’m going blind, please help.
There I sat until three,
Gettin’ further behind myself, by myself.
And I’m hung upside down,
And I’m hung upside down,
And I’m hung upside down,
Come on, come on,
Hung upside Down.”

I’m going to try to speed through this one. I’m quickly eating supper as I write and am off to meet some friends for karaoke a little later but I wanted to make sure I got a post in before I did. My go to song for karaoke is usually “Turning Japanese” by the Vapors and “This Town Ain’t Big Enough For The Both Of Us” by Sparks, but I might try new ones tonight, like “Ballroom Blitz” or even “Crazy Train”, who knows. Last time I did karaoke I totally slayed “Bad Touch” but completely massacred “Kiss From A Rose”. With me, you never quite know what you’re going to get.

So without delay, Buffalo Springfield…

LEGENDARY_BUFFALO.png

No, no, no… I don’t have time for puns based on the band’s name. I need to speed through this otherwise I’ll be late for karaoke and miss Luis hitting on the girl behind the bar.

This album seems to be mirroring the last one in a really weird way. I’ve currently experienced two albums in a row that have left out the band’s most popular and definitive song. This was actually brought to my attention by Sandra and Graham, who both knew the song and sounded rather disappointed that it didn’t appear on this album. And although for Country Joe and The Fish, the famous song would eventually appear on their next album, the Buffalo Springfield one had a very different path. Lots would correct me in saying, “But Hey! It appears on their first album, derpaderpadurrr…”. Which isn’t false, but it actually doesn’t appear on the original pressing and instead suddenly appeared as the opener of their debut album in a 1967 pressing, which if you’re observant is the same year that this album came out. Why didn’t they just put it on this one? Who knows. But for you’re listening pleasure, here’s the famous Vietnam protest song (yes coincidentally it’s also a Vietnam protest song like The Country Joe and The Fish one), “For What It’s Worth”:

 

There. Happy? now we can move on.

Here’s another album where I recognized a song from my Roots of Rock N Roll class, “Bluebird”, that unfortunately also didn’t get much airplay on my ipod. Why? I don’t know, other songs just took up more time and I never really gave this one a chance. I did now. It’s pretty good. Pretty Damn good.

That’s basically this album in a nutshell, damn good blues infused folk rock. I mean, you can’t fail when you have Crosby, Stills and Young writing music. Yeah, that’s right, the main dudes of Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young were here writing music before forming their super dupe power band (and before Neil Young would explode in his solo career). However, despite this, the album does feel a tad inconsistent and lacks in flow as a whole, coming off as a greatest hits compilation rather than it’s own album. If anything this is a testament to how great the music on it really is. Sure, it may not all work together as a whole, but individually they are all great tracks (except for “Sad Memory” in my opinion, which comes across as a sappy love tune that I’d skip 99% of the time). And that’s where the inconsistency comes in. Songs like “Sad Memory” and “Expecting To Fly” sound like they should be on completely different albums. Especially knowing that Neil Young rented out a studio to record “Expecting To Fly” on his own time with studio musicians who all believed it was part of his solo album. No other member of Buffalo Springfield actually appears on this song. And when you have every band member kind f just sharing in the songwriting, doing their own tunes and putting it all together, it really just adds to that compilation feel.

That being said, there’s no denying the music itself is great. “Expecting To Fly” may stick out, but in a good way, playing off as a beautiful piece of music with strings and atmosphere, a nice little break in the middle of the album. The opener “Mr. Soul” is a great upbeat blues rock song, with layered guitar performances that has you tapping your toes and “Hung Upside Down” has you hanging on, wanting to continue for more. The closer “Broken Arrow” seems to be an arrangement of live and studio performances melded together, with small breaks and pauses in the song itself. Odd choice, but works quite well.

That’s all I have to say for now. Going to finish my supper and run off to Karaoke. Block your ears, you’ll be in for an unpleasant night.

Song of Choice: Hung Upside Down

-Bosco

1001 Albums: Electric Music For The Mind And Body

#79

Album_79_Original.jpg

Artist: Country Joe and the Fish

Album: Electric Music for the Mind and Body

Year: 1967

Length: 43: 30

Genre: Acid Rock/Blues Rock

“She hides in an attic concealed on a shelf
Behind volumes of literature based on herself
And runs across the pages like some tiny elf
Knowing that it’s hard to find
Stuff way back in her mind
Winds up spending all of her time
Trying to memorize every line
Sweet Lorraine, ah sweet Lorraine.”

Man was this a throwback to a few years ago. three to be exact (could be two, I don’t know anymore). Around my final year of university I had taken a course on the history of Psychedelic Music. Knew nothing about it but took it because I enjoyed the teacher’s Rock n’ Roll history class and was excited to learn about a music genre I barely knew anything about and wanted to expand my music knowledge. It was a pretty good class, looking at all sorts of genres that would act as precursors to psychedelic rock, looking at bands such as Syndicate of Sound, The 13th Floor Elevators, Jimi Hendrix, The Beatles and The Rolling Stones. One of the bands we had briefly looked at would be one that stayed with me since then, one of their songs getting some good playtime on my ipod. It was none other than Country Joe and The Fish.

man with fish.jpg

No, not that country joe and the fish, although I’m sure he’s doing just fine.

I’m talking about the band. That quirky sounding band that incoporated odd guitar sounds and rhythms, strange vocals and wacky riffs.  Well, that’s what I believed at least from the song that I kept listening to. I was curious to hear what a full length album by them would sound like based on knowing that one song and wouldn’t you believe it, it was nowhere to be found on this album.

For those wondering what it was, it was their live show staple and fan favourite “I-Feel-Like-I’m-Fixin’-To-Die-Rag”. A protest song that tackled their feelings towards the vietnam war that had you hooting and hollering along as you danced to kazoo like sounds. It was such an important protest song at the time that I’m completely surprised that they didn’t include it on their debut album.

For you’re listening pleasure, here it is:

It’s honestly such a fun ditty that it’s a shame that it’s nowhere to be seen in this album’s 43 minute run time.

But… on second thought, it’s not crazy that they decided to exclude it. Listening to the album, it would have stuck out like a sore thumb. There doesn’t seem to be an appropriate place in the album to put it without it killing the pace and vibe that the album was working so hard to create. I honestly should have expected it from the other song that didn’t get as much airplay on my ipod that we heard in class “Not So Sweet Martha Lorraine”, a staple of psychedelic rock history due to it’s strange and absurd lyrical content of introspection and possible drug induced imagery and it’s swirling keyboards. Wasn’t crazy about it then as I cranked up their protest song, but hearing it here I definitely acquired much more admiration for it.

I really enjoyed this album. Found myself going on quite a trip from start to beginning and never felt a moment where I was taken out of it, each song contributing to that solemn yet peppy vibe that The Fish were permeating throughout. The first half of the album keeps you on your toes with some upbeat blues infused psychedelic rock which slowly deteriorates into harsher and trippier psychedelia throughout the second half. Even though it’s technically acid rock, it feels more like a toned down version of what we would eventually get to know as Psychedelic music but the elements are still there and I can definitely see how this would have helped in developing the genre. From their song “Death Sound” that has some fantastic reverb effects on the guitar to “Section 43” one of the greatest instrumental tracks I ever heard, that takes you on a trip and actually seems to tell a story… in sections, similar to what prog rock would eventually do with their music. Multiple instrumental tracks put together to tell one coherent story. By the time you hit “Sad and Lonely Times” you know you’re in for a bit of a trip as each song starts to get dipped into the acid pool of textures and feelings. “Bass Strings”, “Masked Marauder” and “Grace” (a tribute to Jefferson Airplane’s Grace Slick) feel out of this world and although it’s never at the heights of psychedelic music to come it definitely set the groundwork for it’s successors to reach higher heights that the Fish didn’t hit.

May have been overshadowed by future acts ad albums within the genre but definitely worth a checkout if you can, especially for those keys. Man I love that keyboard work.

Song of Choice: Section 43

-Bosco

p.s. “I-Feel-Like-I’m-Fixin’-To-Die-Rag” would appear on their second album of the same name. So it wasn’t completely excluded from their discography.

 

1001 Albums: Roger The Engineer

#74

Album_74_Original

Artist: The Yardbirds

Album: Roger the Engineer

Year: 1966

Length: 35:52

Genre: Blues Rock

“Sit spellbound by a flickering screen,
Watch the ever changing scenes,
Listen to the rising screams,
Of children of today.
Lock your doors and stay within,
Upon your face the stupid grins,
Penalty for unrealized sins,
Committed on your way.”

Oh boy am I excited. I’ve been waiting anxiously to get to this album. As it quickly approached I grew more and more excited. Every passing album a reminder that I was another album closer to listening to this one. Now, I’ll be honest, I had only listened to Roger the Engineer once before, so my memory of it wasn’t the greatest but I did remember loving it very much so the thought of experiencing it anew a second time was a thrilling one.

Around this time last year was when I had decided I wanted to start listening to as much music as possible. It was around this time that I had made the decision that I would take the challenge of listening to every album on the 1001 albums list. But before I got organized about it and chose to write about each album, I had started in the 80s, listening to only those albums. Before that, I had started listening to band’s complete discographies. That’s where the story truly began. I felt at this point, with my love for music, there were bands I should listen to. This started with the “important” bands that every has heard, so at least I can say I’ve listened to them. This included The Beatles, Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd, bands I felt I needed to listen to just because I felt like I had to. I mean these were bands everyone was talking about all the time, at least now I wasn’t in the dark about them.

So, as I was making my way through various bands, I took a look at the big ones that were part of the British Invasion. This led me to discover what I feel is my favourite of them, The Yardbirds. I honestly feel like the Yardbirds is grossly under-rated. Most people I know haven’t heard of them and are shocked to discover how big of a band they really were. I mean, it makes sense. The Yardbirds were eclipsed by the giants that were The Beatles, Rolling Stones and The Who and although they garnered critical praise, their legacy would only be remembered by music fans. Remember when I made the analogy of the British Invasion being like a family? If the Beatles were the cute younger brothers, the Rolling Stones the sexy, mature older brothers and The Who were the rebellious teenagers then The Yardbirds were like the forgotten fourth child, shadowed by the success of his older brothers. Which is really a shame because I personally think they’re the best of the four.

The Yardbirds were a powerhouse of a band that managed to yield not one, not two but three of guitar playing history’s greatest legends. They are: Eric Clapton, who was part of the original line-up and left to be part of the Bluesbreakers and eventually Cream, Jeff Beck, who is featured on this album and Jimmy Page, who would go on to form Led Zeppelin. That’s right, Led Zeppelin, everyone’s favourite band to put on their top ten list would never have existed if it weren’t for the Yardbirds (especially since Jimmy Page would heavily borrow from The Yardbirds music to create Led Zeppelin songs, but that’s a story for another time). I’m actually surprised at how many people I’ve talked to who loooooove Led Zeppelin yet have never even heard about the Yardbirds (personal experience, I’m sure there are tons who do).

Ok, so I’m rambling about the band itself, what about the album? Well, there’s a few great things to note. This one is a rather special one in their catalogue as it’s their only album to feature only original material. And boy do they really show off their talents with this one. The real hero is definitely Jeff Beck, infusing blues rock riffs with psychedelic effects such as reverb and long sustained notes that whammy their way to your heart and soul. This is in part what makes this album so great. Unlike the previous album, the Yardbirds don’t play straight blues rock but play around with it to create something new and unique by incorporating psychedelic rock elements. It never becomes an actual psychedelic trip and always remains in the blues rock world (with elements of pop) but it’s this small infusion that really makes it memorable.

People who know me know I love a band that knows how to use their bass. This is one of those bands. With songs like “Lost Woman” and “What Do You Want” that have nice, loud and infectious bass lines that pop out and stick with you. You can feel the bass groove leaking through your headphones and into your body, taking it over and getting you lost in it.

Ok, the album isn’t perfect and does have some pop filler, “Farewell” comes to mind, but these lows are contrasted with great tunes like “Over Under Sideways Down”, which was the name of the US release, Jeff’s Boogie, an infectious dance beat that is true to it’s name, “Hot House of Omargashid” and “The Nazz are Blue”, two songs I feel you should just check out for yourself. The flow of the albums makes it easy to get through the slightly poppy tunes as they’re mashed between the great ones. it doesn’t matter if you’re not enjoying one, chances are you’ll love the next.

The album remains an incredibly memorable one and I loved it even more listening to it the second time around. If there’s ever an album I would suggest my readers (all four of you) to listen to, it would be this one.

But then again… that’s just… like… my opinion, man.

Song of Choice: What Do You Want

-Bosco

 

 

 

1001 Albums: Blues Breakers With Eric Clapton

#73

Album_73_Original.jpg

Artist: John Mayall and the Blues Breakers

Album: Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton

Year: 1966

Length: 37:39

Genre: Blues Rock

“You’ve been mistreated, little girl,
But I swear, I swear it’ll be outgrown.
You’ve been mistreated, little girl,
But I swear, I swear it’ll be outgrown.
I’m gonna give you a love, child,
Something you’ve never known.”

So, I’m basically 95% done with this semester. Have all my exams written and just have to complete one final assignment. Decided to kick it old school and do one of my Green Screen videos again. Haven’t done one in awhile but have been wanting to, so took advantage of this assignment to finally do another. With all that mostly done and new free-time being presented to me, I hope to go back to how I was and try cranking out one post at least every two days. I think it’s fairly do-able at the moment, at least until I hit mid-terms and finals of the next semester.

So… John Mayall and the Blues Breakers. They’re not kidding when they call themselves the Blues Breakers. This is one fine blues rock album. From the very first guitar riff to the final notes, I found myself snapping my fingers and tapping my toes to some upbeat and hard rocking blues music. I am actually willing to debate that the opening notes of the opening track, “All Your Love”, is some of the most iconic and memorable openings of any song (Not the most, that award goes to Van Halen’s “Jump”, but definitely up there). Since I first heard it up to this moment that I am writing about it, it still plays clearly in my head on a constant loop. Anybody familiar with it would recognize that song instantly just from the opening riff. There’s really no low points on this album and it succeeds in keeping you engaged the whole way through. However, I should note that this is mostly thanks to Eric Clapton’s guitar playing and the actual Blues breakers themselves (but to be fair to them, they are very talented and bust their ass to give you some rocking blues).

I can back up what I said. You see, before this album was created it was originally intended to be a Live Album. John Mayall wanted to show off the energy the Blues Breakers had on stage, but specifically, he also wanted to show Eric Clapton’s skills. After a botched recording of their live show, they decided to go into the studio to record an album with the sole purpose of recreating their high energy performances but once again, focusing on Eric Clapton’s guitar playing. Why else do you think Eric Clapton gets special mention in the title of the album? This is more his album than the rest of the band’s and boy does it show. His guitar work is at the forefront of every song and he doesn’t disappoint. If their goal was to show off their energy and his talent, they succeeded tremendously. A particular high is the instrumental track “Hideaway” that just lets Clapton go all out on his own, riffing and playing to his heart’s content. This album would become highly influential mostly due to Eric Clapton’s playing, which would set a standard for the development of rock guitar playing (although we really should credit Chuck Berry for revolutionizing the rock guitar, but he’s not on this list because he was more of a singles guy, so Clapton will take the honor for it for now) and he would become one of rock history’s first Guitar Heroes (around this time graffiti was appearing everywhere on the streets calling Clapton a god).

I have quite a number of friends who actually aren’t crazy about Eric Clapton and think he’s a highly overrated guitar player. I guess I can see why. Listening to it now, he might seem a little dated and in comparison to other guitar legends who would appear on the scene after him, he does sort of pale in comparison. So, I can understand where they’re coming from. Unfortunately for them I think differently and still believe Eric Clapton can hold his own weight in guitar playing even to today’s standards.

As a whole, there are some forgettable (yet really good) songs on the album and I wouldn’t say the album itself is really top 10 material. I mean, without Clapton this album would have probably fallen into obscurity as just another ok blues rock album. (In all fairness I should be giving credit to John Mayall as well for doing solid work). Before coming into this band, Clapton was part of the Yardbirds but had to leave due to creative differences. He felt they were too pop for his tastes and wanted to tackle more blues-inspired music with a mix of hard rock. The meeting of John Mayall and Eric Clapton was a stroke of luck for the two men, who thought identically about what they wanted to do. If it weren’t for that I don’t think this album would even exist as it does. Even though the rest of the band is talented, I feel a lot of it’s success did fall on the shoulders of Eric Clapton who gave it it’s blues-inspired energy and rock infused riffs.

Ok, ok, I’ll stop mentioning that. I realise I’m repeating myself about Clapton and the band, but that’s honestly what I feel about it. So instead of repeating myself once again I’ll leave you with some of my own blues-inspired lyrics:

I got out of bed
had me some lunch
It tasted real bad
So I took a cat nap
lasted three hours
Oh, little girl
I’m sorry I missed your show
But the fact of the matter is
I never wanted to go

*Harmonica blairs, guitar explodes, everyone cries*

Song of Choice: Hideaway

-Bosco